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AMD Announces Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors, Previews EPYC Milan

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  • #31
    4700U is not a bad processor at all - the issue is with poor driver quality and support, that is so typical for AMD. Bad BIOS - everything locked. Even for Windows Inetl&Nvidia drivers are much more stable than AMD. SO here I am not even sure what is better - get 4700U or wait for 5XXXU something. From one side the platform that is on the market already have a good chance that drivers will be fixed and general Linux support will be in better shape. And that for sure so for Intel world - if you get the "latest and greatest" hardware prepare to meet bugs everywhere and wait for sometime before they will be cleaned.

    But in case of AMD I can not be sure that they will not abandone Renoir series as they are - half-unusable - and focuse on Cezanne or Rembrandt or watever will come next. Too many diferent products in the bucket , and from what I see now AMD has focused on one thing only - GAMES. If you play games, if games is all you do and all yoiu need - then AMD is a good choice. In terms of gaming performance per watt AMD is very good. But as far as battery life in non-gaming tasks matters - documents, spredsheets, programming , web browsing etc - AMD is way behind. If they want to compete with intel on laptop marked they will have to do something about it, the more laptops are in use the more real battery staticstics is known. You can design "special" tests showing power efficiency - but that can do nothing with the real experience while using the laptops. Unfortunately the share of linux users with AMD laptops so far is very small now, so all the hope is that some of the windows driver code will be finally ported to linux....

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    • #32
      Originally posted by tuxd3v View Post
      will be there av1 decode for the 5000 series?

      I hope they have, at least some models, with dual-channel ram too..
      Considering how their entire keynote was focused on connectivity, media, teleconferencing, and how long it can playback video on battery, I guess, yes? Maybe. It would be shame if it doesn't. Big shame. I am afraid it will not have it :/

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
        It is frustrating enough that I was considering just buying the tiniest ITX case I could, an ITX board and a Ryzen Pro 4750G or something (which can be found in Akihabara if you poke around the right shop) with a picoPSU or similar. But even that has an enormous footprint compared to a NUC.
        +10 Geek points.

        I like this thin mini-ITX case (damn expensive, though), but take care that the motherboard & cpu cooler are compatible:

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        • #34
          Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
          Which part don't you understand? You've just articulated all the reasons why the lack of EPYC 5000 is a problem, lol. The Opteron 3000 series was replaced by EPYC 3000 for the embedded market. EPYC 7000 replaced the Opteron 6000 for high end. There is no AMD replacement (yet) for the Opteron 4000 series at the middle tier.
          Sorry, I didn't know any of that.

          I doubt they'll use the EPYC branding to replace the Opteron 5000, however. I think it's either Ryzen Pro or Threadripper, depending on whether the market segment is more corporate or workstation.
          Last edited by coder; 13 January 2021, 04:35 PM.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by coder View Post
            +10 Geek points.

            I like this thin mini-ITX case (damn expensive, though), but take care that the motherboard & cpu cooler are compatible:

            Interesting, thanks.

            That said, it seems like a "thin" ITX system will mean too many compromises. A NUC is a compromise, I understand that, but I'm prepared to compromise a little to get a system with an internal volume smaller than a 500ml soda bottle. One of the reasons I wanted an AMD APU-based NUC-clone was the ability to get a (semi-)decent GPU in it. I also want to try ROCm without spending a small fortune to do it...

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
              I'm prepared to compromise a little to get a system with an internal volume smaller than a 500ml soda bottle.
              That's not much bigger than a Pi!

              As you probably saw, this case is 1.4L. However, it looks to have much better convection than most NUC-likes and is aluminum. I doubt there exist mini-ITX cases much smaller. Also, I think 120 W should be a decent amount of headroom for the turbo boost of 65 W APUs.

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              • #37
                Unfortunately the new models have the same low number of PCIe lanes which once again means no thunderbolt / USB4.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Jabberwocky View Post
                  I am willing to spend big bucks ($2500 or more) on a Zen3 laptop with GDDR5 RDNA2 that lighter than my current laptop.
                  RDNA2 is not GDDR5... it is 256bit GDDR6+128MB 12nm Infinity cache. (6800/6800XT/6900XT)

                  some smaller notebook parts are 192bit GDDR6+128MB 12nm Infinity cache

                  just to make a comparison

                  "256bit GDDR6+128MB 12nm Infinity cache" means the performance of "GDDR6X, 1219MHz, 384bit, 936GB/​s "

                  there is no big difference betwen a Nvidia 3090 with GDDR6x 384bit and a 6900XT with 256bit GDDR6+128MB 12nm Infinity cache

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by coder View Post
                    That's not much bigger than a Pi!

                    As you probably saw, this case is 1.4L. However, it looks to have much better convection than most NUC-likes and is aluminum. I doubt there exist mini-ITX cases much smaller. Also, I think 120 W should be a decent amount of headroom for the turbo boost of 65 W APUs.
                    My 3200G rig (1TB NVMe drive, 32GB RAM, an extra 2TB HDD that spins up when needed) chews about 200 watts easy when playing a light game. I run it from a massive 280AH battery and 1000W inverter, and jees, I didn't expect 200W's from a 3200G system.
                    Hi

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by asriel View Post

                      How long does it survive on battery? As I've seen the detail your model can have 40, 51 or 68 watt-hr options - so it is also important to know which battery you have. My Inspiron 5405 have 40 wh battery which is too small but Inspiron 5401 (almost same dell but intel-based) have same 40wh but lasts way longer (5hrs on amd vs 8 on intel)
                      I specifically went for the 68Wh option. It's weight is more than 1.6KG which is on the heavy side from my perspective, my previous work laptop was a Macbook Air 13. It's also much louder, but I'm very happy with it considering I can actually run heavy workloads in minikube. After more than 2 years worth of daily use it's now sitting at 48Wh. I used to be able to stretch to 8 hours, but now it's just over 5 in an ideal workload.

                      Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post

                      RDNA2 is not GDDR5... it is 256bit GDDR6+128MB 12nm Infinity cache. (6800/6800XT/6900XT)
                      My mistake. I've been lagging behind, even RDNA1 is using GDDR6! This will be a huge improvement from my DDR4 based Vega8.

                      some smaller notebook parts are 192bit GDDR6+128MB 12nm Infinity cache

                      just to make a comparison

                      "256bit GDDR6+128MB 12nm Infinity cache" means the performance of "GDDR6X, 1219MHz, 384bit, 936GB/​s "
                      I need to read about this more. I remember reading about memory compression in RDNA2 but have not read anything about infinity cache on the GPU.

                      Originally posted by stiiixy View Post

                      My 3200G rig (1TB NVMe drive, 32GB RAM, an extra 2TB HDD that spins up when needed) chews about 200 watts easy when playing a light game. I run it from a massive 280AH battery and 1000W inverter, and jees, I didn't expect 200W's from a 3200G system.
                      Strange. I had a 3200G in a mini-itx M/B with a Radeon 560 and my system struggles to reach 140W. I played PUPG on it for about 6 weeks while I waited for a new CPU. I measured it at the wall (230V AC) so the DC reading will probably be ~15% lower.

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