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AMD Announces Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors, Previews EPYC Milan

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  • nils_
    replied
    Unfortunately the new models have the same low number of PCIe lanes which once again means no thunderbolt / USB4.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
    I'm prepared to compromise a little to get a system with an internal volume smaller than a 500ml soda bottle.
    That's not much bigger than a Pi!

    As you probably saw, this case is 1.4L. However, it looks to have much better convection than most NUC-likes and is aluminum. I doubt there exist mini-ITX cases much smaller. Also, I think 120 W should be a decent amount of headroom for the turbo boost of 65 W APUs.

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  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    +10 Geek points.

    I like this thin mini-ITX case (damn expensive, though), but take care that the motherboard & cpu cooler are compatible:

    Interesting, thanks.

    That said, it seems like a "thin" ITX system will mean too many compromises. A NUC is a compromise, I understand that, but I'm prepared to compromise a little to get a system with an internal volume smaller than a 500ml soda bottle. One of the reasons I wanted an AMD APU-based NUC-clone was the ability to get a (semi-)decent GPU in it. I also want to try ROCm without spending a small fortune to do it...

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
    Which part don't you understand? You've just articulated all the reasons why the lack of EPYC 5000 is a problem, lol. The Opteron 3000 series was replaced by EPYC 3000 for the embedded market. EPYC 7000 replaced the Opteron 6000 for high end. There is no AMD replacement (yet) for the Opteron 4000 series at the middle tier.
    Sorry, I didn't know any of that.

    I doubt they'll use the EPYC branding to replace the Opteron 5000, however. I think it's either Ryzen Pro or Threadripper, depending on whether the market segment is more corporate or workstation.
    Last edited by coder; 13 January 2021, 04:35 PM.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
    It is frustrating enough that I was considering just buying the tiniest ITX case I could, an ITX board and a Ryzen Pro 4750G or something (which can be found in Akihabara if you poke around the right shop) with a picoPSU or similar. But even that has an enormous footprint compared to a NUC.
    +10 Geek points.

    I like this thin mini-ITX case (damn expensive, though), but take care that the motherboard & cpu cooler are compatible:

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  • baryluk
    replied
    Originally posted by tuxd3v View Post
    will be there av1 decode for the 5000 series?

    I hope they have, at least some models, with dual-channel ram too..
    Considering how their entire keynote was focused on connectivity, media, teleconferencing, and how long it can playback video on battery, I guess, yes? Maybe. It would be shame if it doesn't. Big shame. I am afraid it will not have it :/

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  • asriel
    replied
    4700U is not a bad processor at all - the issue is with poor driver quality and support, that is so typical for AMD. Bad BIOS - everything locked. Even for Windows Inetl&Nvidia drivers are much more stable than AMD. SO here I am not even sure what is better - get 4700U or wait for 5XXXU something. From one side the platform that is on the market already have a good chance that drivers will be fixed and general Linux support will be in better shape. And that for sure so for Intel world - if you get the "latest and greatest" hardware prepare to meet bugs everywhere and wait for sometime before they will be cleaned.

    But in case of AMD I can not be sure that they will not abandone Renoir series as they are - half-unusable - and focuse on Cezanne or Rembrandt or watever will come next. Too many diferent products in the bucket , and from what I see now AMD has focused on one thing only - GAMES. If you play games, if games is all you do and all yoiu need - then AMD is a good choice. In terms of gaming performance per watt AMD is very good. But as far as battery life in non-gaming tasks matters - documents, spredsheets, programming , web browsing etc - AMD is way behind. If they want to compete with intel on laptop marked they will have to do something about it, the more laptops are in use the more real battery staticstics is known. You can design "special" tests showing power efficiency - but that can do nothing with the real experience while using the laptops. Unfortunately the share of linux users with AMD laptops so far is very small now, so all the hope is that some of the windows driver code will be finally ported to linux....

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  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by AdrianBc View Post
    NUC-like computers with AMD Renoir have multiplied a lot recently, e.g. from ASUS, Gigabyte, ASRock and a few others, but they are still somewhat hard to find, except maybe the ASUS PN50, which was the first model available.

    It is likely that there will be even more NUC-like computers with AMD Cezanne, but they will probably not appear before the autumn, so if you want one, you might be able to get it only by the end of the year.
    Yes, I know. That was kind of my point. I can get the Asus NUC-clone here without too much trouble (although I can't get the top-end model) but the other manufacturers are absolutely useless.

    It is frustrating enough that I was considering just buying the tiniest ITX case I could, an ITX board and a Ryzen Pro 4750G or something (which can be found in Akihabara if you poke around the right shop) with a picoPSU or similar. But even that has an enormous footprint compared to a NUC.

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  • Mez'
    replied
    Originally posted by AdrianBc View Post


    I do not think that you need to worry about that.

    Better CPUs continue to appear all the time, so whatever you buy it will not stay the best for long.

    Obviously, a 4700U would have been much more valuable one year ago, but it is still a decent CPU, which should be OK for many years.

    While I have succeeded to upgrade my desktop to a 5900X, I am still using without problems a laptop with a Skylake from 2016.

    Because it was the top model of Skylake in 2016, it still has completely acceptable performance today, even if, of course, I would never buy a new computer now, with this level of performance.

    The same should be true for a 4700U in a few years.

    In the worst case, if you will long for a better Cezanne CPU later this year, you can still attempt to sell the 4700U laptop, to recover a part of the expenses.

    It is likely that Cezanne CPUs will be difficult to buy at least during the next few months, so having a new laptop right now can be worthwhile enough.
    I really hope so.

    I've had my current Asus laptop with a low end APU A4-3300M (already weak at the time of purchase) for 9 years. Fortunately it has a Radeon HD 6650M dedicated GPU and VA-API can take over to some extent. It was of a very good build quality and I'm sad to force it into retirement while still operational.
    I certainly expect to squeeze 5-6 years out of the new one with a more beefy CPU at purchase time.

    Even though better CPUs will come along, what's getting me worried is I didn't think I was buying this generation so close to the next one. Was hoping for another 6-12 months before update.
    Actually, it might still be 6 months before System76, Tuxedo or Dell* come up with a Linux-based laptop 5000-based in my price range. In the meantime, the A4-3300M is agonizing way too much for me to wait for a possible other match in this very restricted market (AMD and Linux based laptops).


    * I'm aware Lenovo might be the first on the Linux friendly front with a 5000, but I discard them nonetheless as I don't like their design, keyboard or touchpad
    Last edited by Mez'; 13 January 2021, 10:24 AM.

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  • torsionbar28
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    I don't understand this statement. I'm pretty sure no EPYC models fit that range of TDP.

    If you want a CPU in that range, I think that limits you to the 65 W Ryzen models, or else you have to go up to 105 W. As for official ECC support, get a Ryzen Pro, which means you'll probably have to buy the machine prebuilt (since they don't sell Pro CPUs in the retail channel DIY builders).
    Which part don't you understand? You've just articulated all the reasons why the lack of EPYC 5000 is a problem, lol. The Opteron 3000 series was replaced by EPYC 3000 for the embedded market. EPYC 7000 replaced the Opteron 6000 for high end. There is no AMD replacement (yet) for the Opteron 4000 series at the middle tier.

    Ryzen Pro... lol... find me a Ryzen Pro system that ships with ECC memory. They don't exist.

    The Xeon E3 is eating up the market where EPYC 5000 should be competing. Intel sells a lot of Xeon E3's, proving there is indeed a market segment here for a Xeon competitor.
    Last edited by torsionbar28; 13 January 2021, 10:23 AM.

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