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QEMU 5.1 Bringing Many CPU Improvements From Loongson To RISC-V To s390

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  • QEMU 5.1 Bringing Many CPU Improvements From Loongson To RISC-V To s390

    Phoronix: QEMU 5.1 Bringing Many CPU Improvements From Loongson To RISC-V To s390

    QEMU 5.1-rc0 is available as the first step towards this next feature release of this important component to the Linux virtualization stack...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...x=QEMU-5.1-RC0

  • #2
    Is it Raspberry pi powerfull enough to run something like Windows 7 with QEMU ?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
      Is it Raspberry pi powerfull enough to run something like Windows 7 with QEMU ?
      Considering that a decent x86 processor will be a total shitshow when emulating ARM and running a lightweight Linux distro like OpenWrt...

      Also, why you want to run an EOL Microsoft OS on a toy ARM board? The hardware capable of running EOL Microsoft OSes isn't in short supply and won't run out any time soon.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        Considering that a decent x86 processor will be a total shitshow when emulating ARM and running a lightweight Linux distro like OpenWrt...

        Also, why you want to run an EOL Microsoft OS on a toy ARM board? The hardware capable of running EOL Microsoft OSes isn't in short supply and won't run out any time soon.
        Actually it doesn't run that terribly badly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYQyUqFck6I
        [EDIT - I'm wrong - this video advertised as running it, but really was just running as a thin client]

        I think he should do something a bit more challenging though, like running Windows 7 on his wristwatch or his toaster.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          Considering that a decent x86 processor will be a total shitshow when emulating ARM and running a lightweight Linux distro like OpenWrt...

          Also, why you want to run an EOL Microsoft OS on a toy ARM board? The hardware capable of running EOL Microsoft OSes isn't in short supply and won't run out any time soon.
          I need to run a program that is like a small server that is designed to work on Windows only and and the only Windows that comes without loads of crapware in the background is Windows 7.
          And please stop with the EOL. Do you work for Microsoft ?
          Please inform yourself before talking about Windows 7 EOL.
          Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
            Is it Raspberry pi powerfull enough to run something like Windows 7 with QEMU ?
            I don't think that running Windows 7 is the problem, but once you throw application on top of your Windows install I would assume that it would run rather slow.
            But then again you might not even need speed for whatever you want to do so it all depends on what you want to achieve.

            http://www.dirtcellar.net

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              I need to run a program that is like a small server that is designed to work on Windows only
              No duh, it's obvious that you need to run some applications on it. The question is why a raspi instead of a random mini itx board with socket 775 or an Atom. I'm deploying these things all over the place to do embedded-like jobs.

              Please inform yourself before talking about Windows 7 EOL.
              https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/wind...rt-information
              Support for Windows 7 has ended

              After 10 years, support for Windows 7 ended on January 14, 2020. We know change can be difficult, so we are here to help you with recommendations for what to do next and to answer questions about end of support.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                After 10 years, support for Windows 7 ended on January 14, 2020. We know change can be difficult, so we are here to help you with recommendations for what to do next and to answer questions about end of support.
                Technically, if you have an support contract with ESU you can still get support, at something like $50/PC/yr until 2021, when it goes to $100/PC/yr (and double the next year, and the next year) in addition to whatever the CSP partner is charging for providing the service. If you are already a Microsoft volume licensee you get half off (but that comes with its own 6-7 figure cost).

                Of course, some people are willing to run (true) air-gapped W7 systems for embedded needs, but that air-gap typically needs to include using epoxy on the USB ports to prevent "helpful" users from bypassing the air-gap (ask the Iranians about "air-gaps").

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post
                  Technically, if you have an support contract with ESU you can still get support
                  I'm running on the assumption that Danny3 didn't make a support contract. Big gamble, I know.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    I'm running on the assumption that Danny3 didn't make a support contract. Big gamble, I know.
                    You should know that assumptions are bad, but maybe you're not a programmer to know this.
                    In any case it doesn't matter if I did it or not, what matters is that the EOL that you keep repeating is actually later and that we should stay on topic.

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