Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Ongoing CPU Security Mitigation Impact On The Core i9 10900K Comet Lake

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Ongoing CPU Security Mitigation Impact On The Core i9 10900K Comet Lake

    Phoronix: The Ongoing CPU Security Mitigation Impact On The Core i9 10900K Comet Lake

    At least for the workloads tested this round, when booting the new Intel Core i9 10900K "Comet Lake" processor with the software-controlled CPU security mitigations disabled, the overall performance was elevated by about 6% depending upon the workload. Here is a look at the out-of-the-box security mitigations for this new Intel desktop CPU against foregoing the default CPU security mitigations and running an unprotected configuration to see what the pre-Spectre performance looks like.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=29227

  • #2
    Are the mitigations fixed in this CPU and the software is applying unnecessary fixes to problems that no longer exist? I'm struggling to understand this point.

    If that's not the case, and Intel is still releasing CPUs in 2020 which have these vulnerabilities then I have absolutely no idea how they are getting away with this, or why anybody would buy such a product with such known defect in it.

    Said it before, I'll say it again: It's going to be a long, long time before I buy another Intel CPU.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not as bad as it could be. I'd also benchmark it on a system without all the excess overhead of Ubuntu+Gnome+Wayland+4k screen resolution. A simple laptop with Arch or Tumbleweed using xfce or fluxbox or something with 1080p resolution and no wayland. See if you get a greater or lesser difference with and without mitigations on that kind of system. As we know from some recent high-profile reviews, Ubuntu and Fedora struggle mightily to provide a stable gnome desktop with wayland even without stress-testing them.

      Comment


      • #4
        I understand it's not affected by LVI?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by andyprough View Post
          Not as bad as it could be. I'd also benchmark it on a system without all the excess overhead of Ubuntu+Gnome+Wayland+4k screen resolution. A simple laptop with Arch or Tumbleweed using xfce or fluxbox or something with 1080p resolution and no wayland. See if you get a greater or lesser difference with and without mitigations on that kind of system. As we know from some recent high-profile reviews, Ubuntu and Fedora struggle mightily to provide a stable gnome desktop with wayland even without stress-testing them.
          Nicely made anti wayland trolling, but still trolling. Go 'way.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ribs View Post
            ...Intel is still releasing CPUs in 2020 which have these vulnerabilities...
            Yes there are no fast CPUs without hardware vulnerabilities;
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectr...mmune_hardware
            Someone could mass produce and sell an economical 4GHz 64 core non-speculative ARM CPU but there is no incentive as long as no one else does it. (cough cough Amazon)

            Comment


            • #7
              When will Intel have this fixed in the hardware?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ezst036 View Post
                When will Intel have this fixed in the hardware?
                Rumors are : with the release of high performance 10nm CPUs.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ribs View Post
                  Are the mitigations fixed in this CPU and the software is applying unnecessary fixes to problems that no longer exist? I'm struggling to understand this point.

                  If that's not the case, and Intel is still releasing CPUs in 2020 which have these vulnerabilities then I have absolutely no idea how they are getting away with this, or why anybody would buy such a product with such known defect in it.

                  Said it before, I'll say it again: It's going to be a long, long time before I buy another Intel CPU.
                  "nobody has been fired for purchasing Intel" - a common DC mantra.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Intel CPUs are based on the old i/C2D architecture and are only new generations. I dont think they will ever fix them in hardware... to be real, why should they? If they have already fixed it in Software?

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X