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Ubuntu 20.04 LTS vs. Clear Linux On The Intel Core i9 9900KS, AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

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  • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS vs. Clear Linux On The Intel Core i9 9900KS, AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 20.04 LTS vs. Clear Linux On The Intel Core i9 9900KS, AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

    While we have been seeing Ubuntu 20.04 LTS offer better performance with newer hardware platforms, how does the performance compare to Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux? Here are some benchmarks on both AMD Ryzen 9 3900X and Intel Core i9 9900KS systems.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=28981

  • #2
    If only clear linux's package management made any sense to me. I tried it for a little bit but gave up. I needed Icarus verilog but couldn't install it, krita couldn't access my network shares, pureref only comes in an rpm and Deb file, visual studio code was running in a sandbox so the verilog extension I needed had issues. Meanwhile on Ubuntu everything just worked even on 20.04 builds. Icarus verilog was in packages, visual studio code was a snap but could access the whole system, pureref installed without issue with the Deb file, chrome installed without any issues, chrome on clearlinux is a huge pain to work. I don't get why intel made it unusable.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jigglywiggly View Post
      If only clear linux's package management made any sense to me. I tried it for a little bit but gave up. I needed Icarus verilog but couldn't install it, krita couldn't access my network shares, pureref only comes in an rpm and Deb file, visual studio code was running in a sandbox so the verilog extension I needed had issues. Meanwhile on Ubuntu everything just worked even on 20.04 builds. Icarus verilog was in packages, visual studio code was a snap but could access the whole system, pureref installed without issue with the Deb file, chrome installed without any issues, chrome on clearlinux is a huge pain to work. I don't get why intel made it unusable.
      Since it's from Flatpak you have to run the program with --filesystem=/some/dir to access stuff outside of the sandbox. That's one of the biggest peeves I have with running Flats. I get why it's like it is, but with certain programs it isn't very helpful and can be a cause of issues and annoyances. There are a few other ones like --share and --socket that may have helped with the Krita issue.

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      • #4
        It would be nice if there was a way to measure only the core / kernel performance, as it seems most of the advantages for clear come from the additional optimization of the external packages, rather than the os itself.

        Maybe compile the tests with the same flags rather than using whatever the distro package manager offers out of the box.

        And yes, I know that default packages is what most people would use, but there is certainly value in establishing the core performance for people who run proprietary software.
        Last edited by ddriver; 03-23-2020, 08:43 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ddriver View Post
          It would be nice if there was a way to measure only the core / kernel performance, as it seems most of the advantages for clear come from the additional optimization of the external packages, rather than the os itself.

          Maybe compile the tests with the same flags rather than using whatever the distro package manager offers out of the box.

          And yes, I know that default packages is what most people would use, but there is certainly value in establishing the core performance for people who run proprietary software.
          There are numerous tests there using the same exact binaries across platforms like like ArrayFire, Blender, V-Ray, IndigoBench, etc.
          Michael Larabel
          http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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          • #6
            Yes but which one handles Optimus laptop graphics better?
            Fedora still is a pain and difficult to configure.
            I haven't tried Clear in awhile, but it didn't do well with my optimus system last time i attempted it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

              Since it's from Flatpak you have to run the program with --filesystem=/some/dir to access stuff outside of the sandbox. That's one of the biggest peeves I have with running Flats. I get why it's like it is, but with certain programs it isn't very helpful and can be a cause of issues and annoyances. There are a few other ones like --share and --socket that may have helped with the Krita issue.
              There is a graphical app to help manage flatpak permissions: https://flathub.org/apps/details/com...chx84.Flatseal

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              • #8
                Now, retry with LVI.

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                • #9
                  No one uses Ubuntu for performance... I don't understand why Clear Linux keeps getting put against lame defaults. Try Gentoo with their wiki's performance recommendations...

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                  • #10
                    Seems there are, at least, 3 levels of use cases that could be tested for each Linux environment.
                    Server, “power users” and users who just want something that works for their day to day desktop so they can ditch windows.

                    I have “lurked” phoronix for quite awhile and Michael does a great job. Just not sure whether he has the bandwidth to compare each and every Linux over different use cases.

                    Quite sure a self brewed gentoo or lfs, or any other lean, tightly integrated and optimized Linux would be faster than Ubuntu...

                    But, unfortunately (maybe) the regular user just wants something easy to install, no headache config of, especially video and WiFi systems, that will provide all the necessary daily use functionality without having to get, at least, the equivalent of a 2 year degree in Computer Science to manage compilations and command line optimizations..

                    i don’t use Ubuntu on a daily basis, but comparing the ease of install and the time it takes from booting the install to getting online and maybe playing a game vs clear or fedora and not having WiFi, especially on a laptop without a nic port for cabled connection....

                    Anyway, just a thought that ease of install with ease of hardware configuration is often a more important reason for people choosing a Linux flavor as a desktop than a few percent, or tenths of a percent, of performance advantage.

                    And the folks that want server flavor or the “power” users, already know how to choose and optimize their systems. (Often using sites like phoronix for data). Maybe download and run the phoronix test suite yourself and post the results for your gentoo install?
                    Others can check out the numbers themselves to prove or disprove what you post if they want.

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