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AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X Offers Incredible Linux Performance

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  • carewolf
    replied
    Apparently this processor has issues on Windows, because Windows splits virtual cores into groups of 64 and by default applications can only run in a single such group without using special APIs.

    This might be a much better processor for Linux than for Windows.

    Would have loved to see a chromium compile though. That scales extremely well with more cores.

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  • nuetzel
    replied
    Originally posted by numacross View Post
    Meanwhile in Windows the SMT status and OS edition matter a lot for such a large CPU. Anandtech has a good explanation of the issues, but it boils down to having as big differences as:
    Who is running this under such OS...

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  • nuetzel
    replied
    With the 'right' switch for 'MKL-DNN DNNL v1.1'...?

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  • numacross
    replied
    Originally posted by mppix View Post
    This CPU is clearly amazing and I have been looking into putting a system together for scientific calculations. Trouble is there is barely any UDIMM ECC memory available. Most UDIMM ECC tops out at 2133MHz (you would probably want to feed this thing with 3200MHz memory.
    Samsung has a product that fits, but it's not available yet in volume. In the meantime there's the 2666MHz version with the same status, but it's available for purchase. I've had success with running Samsung UDIMM ECC 2400 at 2933 or even 3200MHz on Zen+/2, but it requires a bit of tuning just like Threadripper 3

    TPU published a very nice article about tuning TR3 with great results:



    Leave a comment:


  • intelfx
    replied
    Hot damn.

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  • 111alan
    replied
    Have you tried "node interleave" option for dual xeon config? Some of the tests seems to be numa-unaware.

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  • betam4x
    replied
    I have no use for this many cores, but I might buy one for the hell of it.

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  • betam4x
    replied
    Originally posted by chithanh View Post
    I wonder why the Corsair MP600 was used for this review. According to LTT, AMD specifically recommends not using the current generation of PCIe 4.0 SSDs, due to low number of IOPS.

    Yeah, LTT calls out AMD on this one too. The lack of RDIMM/LR-DIMM support really limits the appeal of this CPU. AMD apparently hopes to sell more Epyc CPUs through these market segmentation games.

    64 Zen1 cores is now "cheap" to build. Epyc 7551 costs around 1300 EUR here, a dual socket Supermicro H11DSi costs around 600 EUR. Add cooler, case, PSU, SSD and you will be at around 3600 EUR. For Zen2 with Epyc 7452 add another 2000 EUR.


    The build times are definitely IO bound. My 1950X gets similar results (20-30 seconds). Sometimes the build system runs so fast, it errors out due to timing issues.

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  • betam4x
    replied
    Originally posted by vb_linux View Post
    Wow, this CPU is a beast. Go AMD

    I read somewhere that with such powerful CPUs, VMware changed their license for CPUs with 32 cores and increased prices for 64 core CPUs.
    They did, however, under Linux, KVM is free and works just fine.

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  • chithanh
    replied
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    The Threadripper 3990X was able to build the Linux 5.4 kernel in just 22 seconds! With some tuning of storage so it's no longer the bottleneck (or building from RAM), we can perhaps see it break 20 seconds... More testing as time allows.
    I wonder why the Corsair MP600 was used for this review. According to LTT, AMD specifically recommends not using the current generation of PCIe 4.0 SSDs, due to low number of IOPS.

    Originally posted by mppix View Post
    This CPU is clearly amazing and I have been looking into putting a system together for scientific calculations. Trouble is there is barely any UDIMM ECC memory available.
    Yeah, LTT calls out AMD on this one too. The lack of RDIMM/LR-DIMM support really limits the appeal of this CPU. AMD apparently hopes to sell more Epyc CPUs through these market segmentation games.

    Originally posted by mppix View Post
    Does anyone have experience with building an affordable (as in <$10k) 64 core system for science/computing?
    64 Zen1 cores is now "cheap" to build. Epyc 7551 costs around 1300 EUR here, a dual socket Supermicro H11DSi costs around 600 EUR. Add cooler, case, PSU, SSD and you will be at around 3600 EUR. For Zen2 with Epyc 7452 add another 2000 EUR.



    Leave a comment:

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