Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ryzen CPUs On Linux Finally See CCD Temperatures, Current + Voltage Reporting

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Wait a minute. /proc/cpuinfo does not have anything to do with thermal or voltage monitoring....

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
      It's not fear. It's lack of training.
      Well, it's kind of the same, you're just looking at another angle than I am.
      It's the lack of knowledge/understanding that causes fear, which you get over with experience, if you're willing to try.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        cpu-z gives much more information than /proc/cpuinfo and it is also updated in real-time (i.e. you can see the CPU frequency and iGPU data change in real time).
        It's hard to judge something you never use, maybe you should look at it first.
        Who said I never used cpu-z? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DSWIo4_E8k that M$ Windows misses OS built-in hw metadata information or easy access to that is not a feature it is a bug. Can you script & automate cpu-z? Also does it directly poke hardware registers without proper control and abstraction of the OS? And /proc/cpuinfo was just an obvious example, I mentioned /sys before. Also: which Admin would want to work with GUI tools for things like this?
        Last edited by rene; 01-17-2020, 11:41 AM.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          It's not fear. It's lack of training. CLI is not intuitive in the slightest. You can give a smartphone to someone that never saw it and he would learn how to use it, with command line stuff.... eeeeeh.... not really. You need documentation and training to actually grasp what you are doing.

          And I'm talking of modern systems that use man and have human-friendly editors like nano. Not if you have complete bs alien commandline tools like vi.

          CLI is maintenance interface, meant to be used by trained personnel only (and power users).
          Not only do normal users complain that modern flat UI is not discoverable, with many active vs. passive elements not easy to differentiate at all, and many hidden features; like many other's I managed to master CLI just fine, when I was 8! on my father's 286, and English was not even my native language, ..! ;-)

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by geearf View Post
            Well, it's kind of the same, you're just looking at another angle than I am.
            It's the lack of knowledge/understanding that causes fear, which you get over with experience, if you're willing to try.
            Fear isn't the only response to that. Many aren't afraid, they are not willing to invest time in learning stuff they will 100% forget as it's a one-off done once every 6 months or whatever.

            I'm also not terribly eager to use command line if I can avoid it, although admittedly Powershell (on Windows) is kind of real fucking bad if compared to Bash and friends

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by rene View Post
              Not only do normal users complain that modern flat UI is not discoverable
              Still beats commandline by a long shot

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                Still beats commandline by a long shot
                what's why most server run Linux or an BSD and not Windows? ;-)

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by rene View Post
                  Who said I never used cpu-z?
                  Comparing cpu-z to /proc/cpuinfo is kind of naive.

                  Can you script, automatic cpu-z?
                  What for. It can log data and you can configure it to show or hide stuff in the UI and logs. You can autostart it.

                  Also does it directly poke aware registers without proper control of the OS?
                  Most likely, as it runs as Administrator and is on Windows. But it was used as an example of a GUI application that shows a lot of useful data, not as a paragon of how stuff should collect information from the system.

                  I mentioned /sys before
                  I said it's madness, and that actual professionals use tools like lspcie and lsusb, which are tools looking at /proc and /sys API and presenting that in a human-readable way.

                  which Admin would want to work with GUI tools for things like this?
                  Windows admins do (yes, remote desktop into a server is a thing in Windows land). Linux/Unix admins use commandline tools and don't read the /proc and /sys API directly anyway

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    Comparing cpu-z to /proc/cpuinfo is kind of naive.
                    Comparing a single use home-brew GUI tool with all the professionally exposed data points of a real operating system in /sys is kinda naive.

                    What for. It can log data and you can configure it to show or hide stuff in the UI and logs. You can autostart it.
                    Obviously any kind of server data logging, tuning, performance analysis and all the other bell's and whistles /sys exposes.

                    Most likely, as it runs as Administrator and is on Windows. But it was used as an example of a GUI application that shows a lot of useful data, not as a paragon of how stuff should collect information from the system.

                    I said it's madness, and that actual professionals use tools like lspcie and lsusb, which are tools looking at /proc and /sys API and presenting that in a human-readable way.
                    Calling lspci and lsusb "professional tools" is kind of a joke by itself. Except one time device inventory you rarely need these, and it is not like they are kind useful for any kind of every day administrative tasks, monitoring, or performance work.

                    Windows admins do (yes, remote desktop into a server is a thing in Windows land). Linux/Unix admins use commandline tools and don't read the /proc and /sys API directly anyway
                    You clearly have no clue what you talk about, sorry, but I have better things to do with my time.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by rene View Post
                      what's why most server run Linux or an BSD and not Windows? ;-)
                      [citation needed]
                      Most statistics are about only some types of servers (web), while actual numbers of total servers around are not really that obvious.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X