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Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance On The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X

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  • Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance On The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X

    Phoronix: Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance On The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X

    The new AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X is performing faster on Linux than Microsoft Windows 10. When carrying out more than 80 different tests on Windows 10 compared to five Linux distributions, Windows 10 was beat out by the open-source competition. However, the performance loss for Windows isn't as dramatic as we have seen out of earlier generations of Ryzen Threadripper HEDT workstations. Here are those benchmarks of Windows 10 compared to Ubuntu 19.10, CentOS 8, Clear Linux, Fedora Workstation 31, and openSUSE Tumbleweed.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=28571

  • #2
    These test results give me comfort and a warm fuzzy feeling inside

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    • #3
      The irony of a Intel OS making AMD cpu's faster is something to behold. They just can't catch a break.

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      • #4
        Interesting that Firefox runs so much better on Fedora than on Ubuntu. What could be the reasons? LTO and PGO? Wayland (Fedora 31 uses a Wayland session and the Firefox Wayland backend by default)?

        For the default browser and therefore probably the most important application it would good to know if Ubuntu could catch up.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by r08z View Post
          These test results give me comfort and a warm fuzzy feeling inside
          Then maybe you should talk to a doctor about your insecurities.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ThoreauHD View Post
            The irony of a Intel OS making AMD cpu's faster is something to behold. They just can't catch a break.
            And it could be even faster, if Glibc would be actually using the Haswell fast path on Zen chips.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by treba View Post
              Interesting that Firefox runs so much better on Fedora than on Ubuntu. What could be the reasons? LTO and PGO? Wayland (Fedora 31 uses a Wayland session and the Firefox Wayland backend by default)?

              For the default browser and therefore probably the most important application it would good to know if Ubuntu could catch up.
              Might have to do with the compiler. Fedora is using gcc for sure, can anyone confirm what Ubuntu is using?

              Michael If I may offer a suggestion, I believe one thing thing missing from your OS evaluations is how it can sustain the performance of each task running when many distinct applications are being used in parallel. For instance, a browser could be open in the background while we are editing something or the opposite, we could be browsing something while a project is being compiled in the background. I did not pick the browser example in vain, it could also be an aspect to look for when evaluating the browsers themselves as well, that is, how they interfere in other programs running. I believe keeping a browser open while doing other things is a fairly common scenario. A possible method to test this would be opening a browser with a defined set of tabs, could even be from files instead of the network to ensure better consistency, then running other benchmarks from the CLI without closing the browser.
              Last edited by SofS; 11-29-2019, 04:45 PM.

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              • #8
                It would be nice to see AMD 3970X performance relative to Intel 10980XE on Windows/Linux to see if one OS exhibits a preference for one or the other HEDT CPU.

                Also the compiler benchmarks (LLVM compile etc.) would have been interesting, as they do stress the operating system's process management a lot.

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                • #9
                  Does anyone know if the “Windows 10 Pro for Workstations” edition has additional tuning for CPUs with a high number of cores? I don’t think I’ve seen anyone benchmark it. I know it permits more than 2 physical CPUs in a single system image, so there have been some tweaks in that area.

                  It would be interesting to see if ReFS could improve the traditionally poor Windows scores on file system dependent tests too.

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                  • #10
                    It's interesting that, while Ubuntu is the slowest of the bunch here, other think it's really fast: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019...ever-released/

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