Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

    Phoronix: Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

    When looking for a heatsink with a small stature for an AMD APU mini PC build for HTPC / file storage use-cases (more on that build in the next day or two), the Noctua NH-L9a-AM4 fit the criteria and so I went with that given the success with the many Noctua heatsinks we have used over the years. For those potentially interested in the NH-L9a-AM4 for an AMD APU like the new Ryzen 5 3400G or for lower-end Ryzen CPUs, I ran some benchmarks with this cooler.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=28276

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    Note 2: For many people, Noctua coolers and fans aren't a valid option unless they add other color schemes to their brown&metal color scheme such as black&metal.
    I despise people who use the PC as a goddamn doll.

    That said, they also sell black 120 and 140mm fans with swappable angle rubbers of different color, with the "Chromax" product line. https://noctua.at/en/products/fan/chromax
    They also sell heatsink covers for their tower heatsinks black or white with swappable inlays of different colors, again with the Chromax product line. https://noctua.at/en/products/access...eatsink-covers

    I meant: beyond (traditional) heatpipes.
    I've seen studies about using carbon nanotubes or other similar nano-sized structure as the wick material inside heatpipes, to increase dramatically the internal surface area, and thus the ability of the phase-changing fluid to absorb (or release) heat.

    I don't think they will do away with the concept of phase-change heat transfer (heatpipe) any time soon. If you find a better material for heat transfer you can always scale up the phase-change devices too with it, so you end up with better and better heatpipes.

    Leave a comment:


  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post

    I have the same cooler on a Ryzen 5 1600, and it's more or less inaudible even when the CPU is fully loaded when compiling, although that's a 65w CPU.

    I'd like to point out that Noctua also makes extremely quiet 40mm fans too. In general Noctua is one of the best if not the best worldwide in low-noise CPU fans.
    See here a ridicolous 21 x 40mm fan setup that is almost as silent as 2x 120 fans.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7DxXhWoliE&t=510

    I don't have professional equipment so I can't provide Sone measurements, sadly.
    Note 1: In my experience, under load Ryzen 3700X (65W) has a significantly higher operating temperature than Ryzen 5 1600 (65W), with exactly the same CPU cooler.

    Note 2: For many people, Noctua coolers and fans aren't a valid option unless they add other color schemes to their brown&metal color scheme such as black&metal.

    Leave a comment:


  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Have you heard of this marvel of space-age technology called heatpipe?
    I believe you might have misunderstood the idea I wanted to convey. Sorry about that.

    I meant: beyond (traditional) heatpipes.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

    Just some notes:
    • Knowing the temperature is somewhat pointless if we do not know the RPM (and thus the noise level) of the cooler. The coolers I have (limited) experience with are becoming audible at about 1100 RPM, so it would be nice to know whether the Noctua cooler is spinning at less than 1100 RPM when running Prime95 Small FFTs on all cores.
    • The benchmarks do not include Prime95 Small FFTs test which is (as far as I know) the best way to heat up a CPU.
    I have the same cooler on a Ryzen 5 1600, and it's more or less inaudible even when the CPU is fully loaded when compiling, although that's a 65w CPU.

    I'd like to point out that Noctua also makes extremely quiet 40mm fans too. In general Noctua is one of the best if not the best worldwide in low-noise CPU fans.
    See here a ridicolous 21 x 40mm fan setup that is almost as silent as 2x 120 fans.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7DxXhWoliE&t=510

    I don't have professional equipment so I can't provide Sone measurements, sadly.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    I suppose cooler manufacturers sometime in the future will be adding graphene or carbon nanotubes to CPU coolers to increase heat conductivity and will switch to new materials with higher heat capacity. Aluminium has higher heat capacity (0.9) than copper (0.385), but unfortunately aluminium has lower heat conductivity (237) than copper (401). It would be very nice to enrich aluminium with material X to increase its heat conductivity so that the combined material aluminium+X can be used in coolers instead of aluminium&copper.
    Have you heard of this marvel of space-age technology called heatpipe?

    Leave a comment:


  • JanW
    replied
    I find it striking that in all examples here the benchmarks seem to have taken more time to complete with the Noctua cooler at full speed. Michael, could you maybe reassure us that the benchmark performance you observed was the same between all cooling methods for all tests? Because if for any odd reason performance was not the same, those temperatures really can't be compared.

    Leave a comment:


  • existensil
    replied
    This cooler is a perfect fit for the ASRock DeskMini A300W. It's such a perfect fit I have to imagine one was designed with the other in mind.

    I think that's still the only Mini-STX chassis with a full-size AM4 socket. If you are looking for the smallest possible AM4 build and want it to have quiet and effective cooling, this is the combo to get.

    Leave a comment:


  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
    I don't think that's the reason anyone would buy this specific cooler. The whole point of it is to be low profile, so you could stick it in a case that a larger (stock) cooler won't fit in.
    I suppose cooler manufacturers sometime in the future will be adding graphene or carbon nanotubes to CPU coolers to increase heat conductivity and will switch to new materials with higher heat capacity. Aluminium has higher heat capacity (0.9) than copper (0.385), but unfortunately aluminium has lower heat conductivity (237) than copper (401). It would be very nice to enrich aluminium with material X to increase its heat conductivity so that the combined material aluminium+X can be used in coolers instead of aluminium&copper.

    http://www2.ucdsb.on.ca/tiss/stretto...ity_Table.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...conductivities

    Leave a comment:


  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    If somebody is buying a stand-alone CPU cooler then the intention - aside from achieving lower noise levels, prolonging CPU lifespan, etc - likely is to overclock the CPU (enable PBO, modify wattage limits, etc).[/LIST]
    I don't think that's the reason anyone would buy this specific cooler. The whole point of it is to be low profile, so you could stick it in a case that a larger (stock) cooler won't fit in.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X