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Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

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  • #11
    Very cool, I've been looking for basically this exact thing.

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    • #12
      I agree that Noctua is the best option if you don't have the space for passive cooling.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
        with Ryzen AMD simply killed a lot of the market for third party coolers.
        It's the same story as always. Most folks are content with the stock cooler because they're not OC'ing and they're not too sensitive to noise (or other things in the environment drown it out). While the Wraith coolers are better than past stock coolers (and current Intel stock coolers), they still leave a bit to be desired.

        Personally, I have a Ryzen 2400G with the Wraith Stealth and I can't wait to get a better cooler. While the fan is not loud, its tonal characteristic is an annoying buzz. If I'm sitting in a quiet environment, it annoys me enough where I will put on music even if I'm not in the mood for it. The Wraith Spire would probably do a better job of keeping the fan from ramping up, but if it's the same fan, I would still want a better cooler.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Caffarius View Post
          For a mostly idle VM host it's amazing.
          In my opinion, there is no point in trying to keep CPU temperatures below 60℃ - any x86 CPU can sustain running correctly for many years without accumulating too much damage at this temperature. The primary reason a cooler is installed on top of a CPU is to prevent excessively high temperatures which could accelerate ageing of the CPU and increase its error rate when to CPU is under load.

          The criterion for choosing a cooler isn't the idle CPU temperature because almost any cooler can easily keep the temperature below 60℃ when the CPU is idle.

          There is no purpose in discerning between CPU/GPU temperatures 40℃ and 50℃.

          The CPU cooler in my desktop machine is spinning near its lowest (quietest) RPM until the CPU temperature reaches 60℃.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

            In my opinion, there is no point in trying to keep CPU temperatures below 60℃.
            My profile's set to ramp the fan from 55-65*C. I stated "mostly idle" because it's a 65W cooler. If you plan on hammering a 95W chip with a 65W cooler, you're usually gonna have a bad time. At full crank the NH-L9a-AM4 will hold my 1700X at 75*C (room temp ~76*F), which is a little higher than I'd like to keep my electronics. But because this box is never at 100% unless I'm doing a Nessus scan it works out perfectly.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by elatllat View Post
              I agree that Noctua is the best option if you don't have the space for passive cooling.
              Actually when it comes to low-profile coolers, Raijintek Pallas seems to be better for single-fan coolers. It almost performs on par with the NH-L12 in dual-fan configuration.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
                If somebody is buying a stand-alone CPU cooler then the intention - aside from achieving lower noise levels, prolonging CPU lifespan, etc - likely is to overclock the CPU (enable PBO, modify wattage limits, etc).[/LIST]
                I don't think that's the reason anyone would buy this specific cooler. The whole point of it is to be low profile, so you could stick it in a case that a larger (stock) cooler won't fit in.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                  I don't think that's the reason anyone would buy this specific cooler. The whole point of it is to be low profile, so you could stick it in a case that a larger (stock) cooler won't fit in.
                  I suppose cooler manufacturers sometime in the future will be adding graphene or carbon nanotubes to CPU coolers to increase heat conductivity and will switch to new materials with higher heat capacity. Aluminium has higher heat capacity (0.9) than copper (0.385), but unfortunately aluminium has lower heat conductivity (237) than copper (401). It would be very nice to enrich aluminium with material X to increase its heat conductivity so that the combined material aluminium+X can be used in coolers instead of aluminium&copper.

                  http://www2.ucdsb.on.ca/tiss/stretto...ity_Table.html
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...conductivities

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                  • #19
                    This cooler is a perfect fit for the ASRock DeskMini A300W. It's such a perfect fit I have to imagine one was designed with the other in mind.

                    I think that's still the only Mini-STX chassis with a full-size AM4 socket. If you are looking for the smallest possible AM4 build and want it to have quiet and effective cooling, this is the combo to get.

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                    • #20
                      I find it striking that in all examples here the benchmarks seem to have taken more time to complete with the Noctua cooler at full speed. Michael, could you maybe reassure us that the benchmark performance you observed was the same between all cooling methods for all tests? Because if for any odd reason performance was not the same, those temperatures really can't be compared.

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