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AMD Ryzen 9 3900X Linux CPU Frequency Scaling Governor Benchmarks

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  • #41
    Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

    Guess what - what you just described here is exactly what schedutil is positioned to do, while the performance governor is not!
    (Or any other governor really...)

    But hey, I guess you must know better than the Linux kernel wizards!
    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...ysis,6253.html
    • Workloads running on Ryzen 3000's slower cores experience lower frequencies than the chip's rated boost speed, and thus lower performance.
    • The combination of Windows 10's new Ryzen-aware scheduler and AMD's chipset drivers allow the operating system to schedule single-threaded tasks into the fastest cores (thread pinning). AMD has previously disclosed the Windows 10 scheduler and the CPCC2 feature, but not that the combined features assign threads to the fastest cores. This functionality requires the latest version of Windows 10. This is somewhat similar to Intel's Turbo Boost Max 3.0 on its HEDT processors, but Intel doesn't set this as a requirement to reach the normal Turbo Boost 2.0 clock speeds.
    • Older versions of Windows cannot schedule threads into the fastest cores as efficiently, thus resulting in lower clock frequencies and performance for Ryzen 3000-series processors in some workloads, which may be at the root of many user complaints.
    Last edited by Raka555; 09-05-2019, 09:26 AM.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by Raka555 View Post

      https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...ysis,6253.html
      • Workloads running on Ryzen 3000's slower cores experience lower frequencies than the chip's rated boost speed, and thus lower performance.
      • The combination of Windows 10's new Ryzen-aware scheduler and AMD's chipset drivers allow the operating system to schedule single-threaded tasks into the fastest cores (thread pinning). AMD has previously disclosed the Windows 10 scheduler and the CPCC2 feature, but not that the combined features assign threads to the fastest cores. This functionality requires the latest version of Windows 10. This is somewhat similar to Intel's Turbo Boost Max 3.0 on its HEDT processors, but Intel doesn't set this as a requirement to reach the normal Turbo Boost 2.0 clock speeds.
      • Older versions of Windows cannot schedule threads into the fastest cores as efficiently, thus resulting in lower clock frequencies and performance for Ryzen 3000-series processors in some workloads, which may be at the root of many user complaints.
      I see now that understanding & following an argument is not your strong point...

      Let me put it this way for all Ryzen owners:

      To fully take advantage of your shiny new processors, you will need to switch over to the schedutil governor once AMD mainlines their CPPC amd_cpufreq driver.
      Why?
      Because then (and only then) will Linux be able to do exactly what Windows 10 can do right now - namely scheduling tasks as efficiently as possible!
      Because the way things are looking now, AMD's Zen CPU driver will have no other option left but schedutil!
      [Maybe it will have a knob to fine-tune the performance vs. power-saving though, as INTEL already has with the x86_energy_perf_policy...]

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