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AMD Ryzen 9 3900X Linux CPU Frequency Scaling Governor Benchmarks

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  • TheYoshiGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post
    Did anyone encounter reboots during heavy load? My Ryzen 9 3900X / Asrock X570 Taichi (firmware 2.0) starts rebooting when CPU temperature reaches somewhere between 70°C and 80°C. For example when building Linux kernel.
    I had the same thing happen literally yesterday. I was building yuzu-git-canary from the AUR (cpu at 100%) and the machine just reset part-way through.
    I don't know what temp I was running, but I have water cooling.
    Asus X470 Crosshair Hero VII (Wi-Fi) with a 3700X.

    It's been stable playing DXVK games.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zan Lynx
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post
    Did anyone encounter reboots during heavy load? My Ryzen 9 3900X / Asrock X570 Taichi (firmware 2.0) starts rebooting when CPU temperature reaches somewhere between 70°C and 80°C. For example when building Linux kernel.
    RAM can certainly be an issue. I started out using 16 GB of HyperX 3600 on my 3900X. It worked pretty well. But after I installed the latest BIOS with AGESA ABB it started to fail with weird RAM errors during heavy compile workloads like Android AOSP image builds and big Rust compiles.

    It didn't matter since the ECC RAM that I'd ordered arrived around then and I haven't had a single problem since. But it isn't running at 3600 either.

    Leave a comment:


  • arQon
    replied
    numacross - The impression I get re OC on Ryzen (mostly from testing by GN et al) is that there simply isn't much room to begin with, and the chips will take what little there is automatically anyway. So BIOS updates won't meaningfully change that, and short of exotic cooling and a lot of +V not much else will either.

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  • microcode
    replied
    Total system energy consumed/dissipated for a given benchmark (with a consistent amount of work, like a compilation task, or a video encoding task) would be a very interesting comparison. Does PTS have support for making charts like that, or would it even be necessary? Michael


    IMHO that's more interesting than a chart of smoothed electrical load over time.
    Last edited by microcode; 09-04-2019, 08:14 PM.

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  • AndyChow
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post

    Thanks. I'll try that. There is an option for CSM legacy boot, so it should work.
    No problem. If you do get errors, you can start removing sticks to identify which one(s) are bad. I once had two bad sticks from a kit of four. It really sucks to find out you have a bad stick. That said, it's better to find out sooner than later, since a stick that has a few errors will silently corrupt a lot of data over time as you are doing things, in addition to causing random system crashes.

    As user willmore has said, "I don't trust a machine that hasn't gone through that." memtest86 is the first thing I run after setting up a new rig, usually for a few days, then I run prime95. I also run badblocks and diskscan on any new hard-drive, though diskscan can give false-fails on shingled drives.

    I hope you solve your issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • shmerl
    replied
    Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
    Most of my experience is with memtest86+, the link you provided. UEFI is mostly not an advantage over legacy BIOS because you're just testing RAM in a single live session, not installing anything nor doing some kernel loading voodoo.
    Thanks. I'll try that. There is an option for CSM legacy boot, so it should work.

    Leave a comment:


  • AndyChow
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post

    Thanks. That's the one that comes with SystemRescueCD? Is there some version of it that works with UEFI, or they are all legacy BIOS?

    I.e. the one I know is memtest86+: https://www.memtest.org
    Yeah... there's memtest86 and memtest86+, and both are different. The link you provided is good. However, there is also: https://www.memtest86.com/ which supports UEFI.

    Both are fine and work well.

    You just boot into it, and it runs a few patterns over all the RAM. If you get a single error, at least one of your stick is bad. The test is never ending, so run it a few passes (which can take a long time), and if you have 0 errors the problem is elsewhere. Most of my experience is with memtest86+, the link you provided. UEFI is mostly not an advantage over legacy BIOS because you're just testing RAM in a single live session, not installing anything nor doing some kernel loading voodoo.

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  • Dedale
    replied
    Thank you Michael for these interesting tests.

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  • shmerl
    replied
    Originally posted by willmore View Post
    I really wish memtest86+ hadn't died. I don't really trust the closed source replacement.
    Stressapptest is open source: https://github.com/stressapptest/stressapptest

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  • willmore
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post

    Is stressapptest enough for that? I run it a few times, and it was fine.
    My personal regimen for breaking in new machines is a day of memtest86+ and then at least one loop through all FFT sizes with prime95. You can optionally do some of the more limited tests which just stress power or L1/L2 cache as they help test power delivery and cooling.

    I don't trust a machine that hasn't gone through that.

    I really wish memtest86+ hadn't died. I don't really trust the closed source replacement.

    Leave a comment:

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