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QEMU 4.1 Released With Many ARM, MIPS & x86 Additions

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  • QEMU 4.1 Released With Many ARM, MIPS & x86 Additions

    Phoronix: QEMU 4.1 Released With Many ARM, MIPS & x86 Additions

    QEMU 4.1 is now out as one of the important pieces to the open-source Linux virtualization stack...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...U-4.1-Released

  • #2
    That sounds like a really nice release. Could someone please explain what

    QEMU 4.1 include VirtIO GPU 2D/3D rendering support for offloading to an external vhost-user process
    means exactly?

    Comment


    • #3
      thanks Michael,
      For the info, as always!

      Originally posted by kmare View Post
      That sounds like a really nice release. Could someone please explain what

      means exactly?
      Means exactly that
      You can develop in quemu VM guest,
      And pass-trough the rendering to a HOST process, also can be presented in HOST hardware graphics card.

      Indeed is seems a very nice release!
      the majority of improvements I noticed,
      Were in ARM( fpu, etc ) and MIPS( specifically MSA SIMD, litle endian and also big endian ), but there are a ton of improvements,
      including the ability to build quemu via kconfig,
      Rendering pass-trough to Host processes, etc..

      Very nice indeed!

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a question. Is it possible to simulate a camera on QEMU?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tuxd3v View Post
          thanks Michael,
          For the info, as always!



          Means exactly that
          You can develop in quemu VM guest,
          And pass-trough the rendering to a HOST process, also can be presented in HOST hardware graphics card.

          Indeed is seems a very nice release!
          the majority of improvements I noticed,
          Were in ARM( fpu, etc ) and MIPS( specifically MSA SIMD, litle endian and also big endian ), but there are a ton of improvements,
          including the ability to build quemu via kconfig,
          Rendering pass-trough to Host processes, etc..

          Very nice indeed!
          Dof a this mean not need to use nasty PCI passtrought, VirtualGL for OpenGL or Wine-based Direct3D emulation? Can it reach native or near-native 2D and 3D rendering so able to run high end software such as videogames?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
            I have a question. Is it possible to simulate a camera on QEMU?
            What do you mean by simulate? You can passthrough a camera to the guest (which will disconnect it from the host). Otherwise, you need a virtual driver for a camera. I'm not sure if one exists.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by timofonic View Post

              Dof a this mean not need to use nasty PCI passtrought, VirtualGL for OpenGL or Wine-based Direct3D emulation? Can it reach native or near-native 2D and 3D rendering so able to run high end software such as videogames?
              VirGL itself is not exactly new, but it lacks a complete Windows driver AFAIK. There's a basic virtio-gpu driver for Windows10, but I don't believe anybody has written a Direct3D driver for it (or ported the Mesa Gallium VirGL). Unfortunately, again AFAIK there isn't even a driver for <Windows 10, which is a shame as in theory it should be possible to re-use gallium-nine to provide D3D9 support. As for performance, it 's less than native, but probably sufficient for most things short of AAA games.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                Otherwise, you need a virtual driver for a camera. I'm not sure if one exists.
                Exactly what I mean. I'm pretty sure it exists to some extent, due to the Android Emulator being based on QEMU and being able to show a checkerboard when I open the camera app.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post
                  Which is a shame as in theory it should be possible to re-use gallium-nine to provide D3D9 support. As for performance, it 's less than native, but probably sufficient for most things short of AAA games.
                  It would probably be easier to provide a Vulkan pass through (which is already in the works afaik) and have a DXVK-based driver. Would avoid having to send DirectX to the host.

                  Imho Gallum-Nine is dead.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    QEMU with KVM finally made using Windows with Linux completely seamless for me. Though I don't need Windows for many things, primarily Band in a Box for myself and debugging things for others, it was always a pain to dual boot into it and leave Linux completely behind for hours or days.

                    But with GPU and USB passthrough I simply run Windows on another monitor or TV while using Linux, and amazingly my own rough benchmarks consistently show a minor 4% overhead for the VM. It's truly amazing.

                    Comment

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