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AMD EPYC 7002 Series Unveiled With Primed Linux Support & Strong Server Performance

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  • AMD EPYC 7002 Series Unveiled With Primed Linux Support & Strong Server Performance

    Phoronix: AMD EPYC 7002 Series Unveiled With Primed Linux Support & Strong Server Performance

    One month ago today we were talking about the AMD Ryzen 3000 series processor and new Radeon RX 5700 series graphics cards, all manufactured on TSMC's 7nm process. Today, for 7th August, the embargo has now lifted and we are talking about something arguably more exciting, or at least the ability to more profoundly impact an industry (data centers): AMD's EPYC 7002 series is ready and their line-up and ultimately the resulting performance is the most exciting and competitive we have seen ever out of AMD in the server space.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=28140

  • #2
    Typos:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    but still straight forward and non-nonsense
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    There are some sour points
    Sore.

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    • #3
      There's really no reason to even consider Intel right now. These chips are incredible monsters. And, to boot, they are even priced better.

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      • #4
        Can someone more familiar with server grade CPUs like EPYC explain why you might want those lower variants? Just for the higher memory capacity and PCIe lanes?(I assume these zen2 EPYC chips also don't gain any extra PCIe lanes in 2P config like the predecessors don't).

        If there were other reasons, I'd assume they'd have variants that could offer better single threaded performance with higher clockrates and memory frequency support, which is basically what consumer and workstation range offer, minus support for LR-DIMMs. Seems like a missing segment between Ryzen/ThreadRipper and EPYC, could they not mix in a die from 3900X for example?

        Sort of a big.little config like ARM has, would work well with that newer scheduler by IBM that phoronix had an article on recently? ThreadRipper can support a nice amount of RAM capacity, but as it's limited to UDIMMs afaik it can't reach that amount any time soon(LR-DIMMs are available at 64-128GB capacities last I checked, and UDIMMs capped out at 32GB).

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        • #5
          256MB of L3! I remember when 256MB of RAM used to be a lot.

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          • #6
            ok when do the laptop options arrive?
            Last edited by elatllat; 08-07-2019, 10:04 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by audir8 View Post
              256MB of L3! I remember when 256MB of RAM used to be a lot.
              I'm imagining a minimal whole OS totally resident in cache and how fast that would be. Maybe a minimal Gentoo install or BSD install. Truly exciting times we live in processor wise. Can't wait for processors like this to trickle down to the laptop sector, even the desktop replacement models.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by audir8 View Post
                256MB of L3! I remember when 256MB of RAM used to be a lot.
                Don't forget it's AMD GameCache™ so it's super awesome!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by polarathene View Post
                  Can someone more familiar with server grade CPUs like EPYC explain why you might want those lower variants? Just for the higher memory capacity and PCIe lanes?(I assume these zen2 EPYC chips also don't gain any extra PCIe lanes in 2P config like the predecessors don't).
                  I'm not even sure memory capacity has much to do with it; it's mostly just the PCIe lanes. So, those might be useful for things like storage servers or GPU-based servers, where you still need a decent amount of processing power to handle the onslaught of data, but the CPU cores aren't the most important thing in it.
                  Sort of a big.little config like ARM has, would work well with that newer scheduler by IBM that phoronix had an article on recently?
                  ARM servers cater to a different market. They're ideal for things like basic Apache servers, where they're not really handling anything complicated but they need all the resources possible to handle incoming requests. Something like an Epyc (or especially Xeon) is overkill for such a task. You can think of it like cashiers at a large retail store: it's not that you couldn't hire people with masters degrees or doctorates, but, you could get the same results hiring teenagers. And much like cashiers, it doesn't matter how good someone is at their job; they can only handle so many customers at a time. So, it's easier to just hire more cashiers.

                  Remember too that most servers that are upgraded often have legacy software that the parent company can't ditch so easily. So, even when something lower ARM, POWER, RISC-V, or SPARC might be a smarter choice, they might opt for x86 just simply because of binary compatibility.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by polarathene View Post
                    Can someone more familiar with server grade CPUs like EPYC explain why you might want those lower variants? Just for the higher memory capacity and PCIe lanes?(I assume these zen2 EPYC chips also don't gain any extra PCIe lanes in 2P config like the predecessors don't).
                    I’m actually surprised at this question, server space isn’t consumer space, as such there is a wide array of needs thus a wide array of chips to support those needs. Frankly this line up better serves a wide array of users than Intel’s splattering each market segment with several dozen SKU’s.

                    A storage server for example has different needs as compared to a web server. Like wise a compute server has different needs than a build server in a software development house. On top of all of that you have the need to EDC RAM and other technologies across a variety of businesses.
                    If there were other reasons, I'd assume they'd have variants that could offer better single threaded performance with higher clockrates and memory frequency support, which is basically what consumer and workstation range offer, minus support for LR-DIMMs. Seems like a missing segment between Ryzen/ThreadRipper and EPYC, could they not mix in a die from 3900X for example?
                    Huh they do just that. However this isn’t consumer grade hardware at all, that means conservative clock rates across the board. If you have an engineer designing a bridge on a work station there is a huge need for highly reliable performance. Note the “highly reliable”. There are in fact many situations where reliable out weighs just about everything else.
                    Sort of a big.little config like ARM has, would work well with that newer scheduler by IBM that phoronix had an article on recently? ThreadRipper can support a nice amount of RAM capacity, but as it's limited to UDIMMs afaik it can't reach that amount any time soon(LR-DIMMs are available at 64-128GB capacities last I checked, and UDIMMs capped out at 32GB).
                    You seem to be answering your own questions here. In any event after looking at the included charts of processor offerings I think AMD put a lot of thought into the lineup. They have basically covered the entire range from engineering workstation to high end server duty with this release.

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