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Linux 5.2/5.3 Kernel Performance On The AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

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  • Linux 5.2/5.3 Kernel Performance On The AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

    Phoronix: Linux 5.2/5.3 Kernel Performance On The AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

    With yesterday's Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Linux benchmarks for the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X, some suggested that the Linux performance could have been better if using a Linux 5.x kernel. Well, here are some benchmarks comparing the performance of Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS with its Linux 4.18 kernel compared to Linux 5.2 stable as well as the brand new Linux 5.3 development kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Ryzen-9-3900X

  • #2
    The problem here is the silly ondemand governor; simply switching over to the performance one should already improve things substantially!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post
      The problem here is the silly ondemand governor; simply switching over to the performance one should already improve things substantially!
      I don't entirely agree. For benchmarking sure, use the performance governor. For everyday use, the ondemand governor works pretty well and with some very basic adjustments can ramp up speeds quickly, to the point that even your benchmarks won't show much of a difference.

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      • #4
        Which register is the governor writing to? I thought SMU clock registers were not available on zen, only P-state control regs.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by NateHubbard View Post
          I don't entirely agree. For benchmarking sure, use the performance governor. For everyday use, the ondemand governor works pretty well and with some very basic adjustments can ramp up speeds quickly, to the point that even your benchmarks won't show much of a difference.
          In my experience with the performance governor all cores of the Ryzen CPU are locked to the all core frequency, so it's worse for single threaded workloads.
          With ondemand and schedutil boost works as expected.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ObiWan View Post

            In my experience with the performance governor all cores of the Ryzen CPU are locked to the all core frequency, so it's worse for single threaded workloads.
            With ondemand and schedutil boost works as expected.
            That's why right now Intel is still the superior choice on Linux:
            With Intel's P-State driver, you can have your cake & eat it too!

            AMD should have developed & mainlined their special driver for their ZEN architecture ages ago...

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            • #7
              By the way, I hope the X570 board of Michael will get that BIOS update soon as I am eager to see a distribution shootout and more CPU comparison tests specific on Clear Linux with Zen 2 against Intel.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

                That's why right now Intel is still the superior choice on Linux:
                With Intel's P-State driver, you can have your cake & eat it too!

                AMD should have developed & mainlined their special driver for their ZEN architecture ages ago...
                They once had an Operating System Research Center in Germany which was responsible for the early bring up of these things on Linux. But that was closed as they were losing money in 2012 (see: https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...tem&px=MTIyMzI). Maybe they should re-vitalize something similar nowadays?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ms178 View Post

                  They once had an Operating System Research Center in Germany which was responsible for the early bring up of these things on Linux. But that was closed as they were losing money in 2012 (see: https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...tem&px=MTIyMzI). Maybe they should re-vitalize something similar nowadays?
                  After a decade of losing tons of cash, it takes time to bring in more resources to help with better products. Even AMD's AGESA versions are buggy as hell right now (certain AGESA versions have a faulty boost algorithm that doesn't hit advertised speeds) when it comes to boost clocks. Although you would think they'd get that one right after the success of Zen 1/Zen +. Hopefully the launch of Zen 3 will be a bit smoother. I'm hanging onto my 1950X until I see what AMD rolls out for a Zen 2 Threadripper. I am contemplating on just building a separate Ryzen 3600 machine since the 3600 is so damn power efficient.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by betam4x View Post

                    After a decade of losing tons of cash, it takes time to bring in more resources to help with better products. Even AMD's AGESA versions are buggy as hell right now (certain AGESA versions have a faulty boost algorithm that doesn't hit advertised speeds) when it comes to boost clocks. Although you would think they'd get that one right after the success of Zen 1/Zen +. Hopefully the launch of Zen 3 will be a bit smoother. I'm hanging onto my 1950X until I see what AMD rolls out for a Zen 2 Threadripper. I am contemplating on just building a separate Ryzen 3600 machine since the 3600 is so damn power efficient.
                    By the way, what is your impression of 1st Gen Threadripper so far? The 1920X is available for 229 EUR which is a steal, but the platform is more expensive and from the RMA rates of the motherboards it seems to be not as reliable. Probably the consumer platform is more mature now as well which would make the 3900X the better deal even though it costs 529 EUR.

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