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AMD Zen 2 CPUs Come With A Few New Instructions - At Least WBNOINVD, CLWB, RDPID

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  • AMD Zen 2 CPUs Come With A Few New Instructions - At Least WBNOINVD, CLWB, RDPID

    Phoronix: AMD Zen 2 CPUs Come With A Few New Instructions - At Least WBNOINVD, CLWB, RDPID

    During the AMD Zen 2 + RDNA launch event they highlighted some of the new instructions to find with the Zen 2 processor but there is at least one more...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...w-Instructions

  • #2
    Looks like the 16-Core Ryzen 9 3950X 105W is going to be out later this year too, yay AMD

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    • #3
      Typo:

      Originally posted by phoronix View Post
      along with the the AMD Optimizing C/C++ compiler

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      • #4
        Originally posted by audir8 View Post
        Looks like the 16-Core Ryzen 9 3950X 105W is going to be out later this year too, yay AMD
        105W? For 16c/32t boosting to 4.7GHz and 72 fucking megabytes of L3? WHAT?
        Dead link, btw.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AsuMagic View Post

          105W? For 16c/32t boosting to 4.7GHz and 72 fucking megabytes of L3? WHAT?
          Dead link, btw.
          With AVX2 too, it does seem too good to be true. It is going to come with a pretty good heatsink. For 4.7Ghz these are clearly the best binned dies.. with smarter turning off of inactive parts of the chip, and the 7nm process maybe it isn't so unrealistic. This anandtech article has a few micro-architecture details: https://www.anandtech.com/show/14525...nd-epyc-rome/6

          Will be interesting to see the benchmarks for sure.

          I wasn't going for a link at all in the post.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AsuMagic View Post

            105W? For 16c/32t boosting to 4.7GHz and 72 fucking megabytes of L3? WHAT?
            Dead link, btw.
            The chip uses two of the Zen 2 eight-core chiplets, paired with an IO die that provides 24 total PCIe 4.0 lanes.

            Probably using the 65w TDP 8c/16t chiplets as a base. Stated price around 750$

            Intel is a fraud, more news at 20:00

            https://www.anandtech.com/show/14516...ming-september

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            • #7
              Originally posted by audir8 View Post
              With AVX2 too, it does seem too good to be true. It is going to come with a pretty good heatsink.
              If they change the heatsink and get a bigger one than the current stock, then yes this would allow them to cheat with their TDP calculation https://www.anandtech.com/show/13124...950x-review/12

              That's still much better than Intel's "let's decide for a number that looks good" approach to TDP though.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                If they change the heatsink and get a bigger one than the current stock, then yes this would allow them to cheat with their TDP calculation https://www.anandtech.com/show/13124...950x-review/12

                That's still much better than Intel's "let's decide for a number that looks good" approach to TDP though.
                This makes total sense, the temps on my AMD chips are way better regulated and within normal range. Intel chips would all overheat and die without powerclamp. I've only found 2 workloads that will push my 1700 beyond 80C, and it's mprime, and only recently a GCC9 compile doing LTO. Even normal usage will push any i5 or i7 beyond 80C pretty quickly. It's really a night and day difference.

                * All with stock heatsinks.
                Last edited by audir8; 06-12-2019, 06:02 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by audir8 View Post
                  This makes total sense, but still the temps on my AMD chips are way better regulated and within normal range.
                  That's because their TDP calculation takes into consideration a honest "full load" condition. They don't care about clock speeds or turbo mode or whatever. They load the CPU and measure temps.

                  So if you slap a heatsink that can deal with that heat generation, lo and behold, temps stay in check.

                  Intel's TDP is fake because it's calculated with Turbo Boost disabled, the actual TDP (if you calculate it with Turbo Boost enabled) is higher, but the stock cooler is sized for Intel's fake TDP, and this means you will overwhelm it.

                  This is a minor inconvenience for enthusiast PC users as you aren't going to use stock cooler anyway, but for everyone else (prebuilt, laptops, mini PCs, tablets) it's a BIG issue and one of the reasons Intel was laughed off the mobile market when they tried to get in tablets and smartphones.

                  Also, disabling Turbo Boost is noticeable in laptops and tablets.
                  Last edited by starshipeleven; 06-12-2019, 06:20 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    That's because their TDP calculation takes into consideration a honest "full load" condition. They don't care about clock speeds or turbo mode or whatever. They load the CPU and measure temps.

                    So if you slap a heatsink that can deal with that heat generation, lo and behold, temps stay in check.

                    Intel's TDP is fake because it's calculated with Turbo Boost disabled, the actual TDP (if you calculate it with Turbo Boost enabled) is higher, but the stock cooler is sized for Intel's fake TDP, and this means you will overwhelm it.

                    This is a minor inconvenience for enthusiast PC users as you aren't going to use stock cooler anyway, but for everyone else (prebuilt, laptops, mini PCs, tablets) it's a BIG issue and one of the reasons Intel was laughed off the mobile market when they tried to get in tablets and smartphones.

                    Also, disabling Turbo Boost is noticeable in laptops and tablets.
                    You usually hear about TIM, but not this. Not sure if it's good or bad that Intel's own stress test in XTU is probably similar to mprime and without disabling a core or two with turbo boost or disabling turbo boost, you'll never get temps under control on an average laptop if you don't want powerclamp slowing down the system.

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