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AMD Zen 2 + Radeon RX 5700 Series For Linux Expectations

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    numacross
    Senior Member

  • numacross
    replied
    Originally posted by Nille_kungen View Post
    The IO die is actually 12nm.
    Yup, you're correct. I was basing my information on earlier news. The 14nm is used for EPYC. Interestingly the X570 chipset itself is actually the same IO die as in Ryzen but in 14nm (unofficial source).


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  • ResponseWriter
    Senior Member

  • ResponseWriter
    replied
    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post

    So it is possible that AMD for the ryzen 4000 goes down to the 5nm tsmc process for the cpu chiplets.
    Isn't 7nm with EUV due next year? Even that would be a small boost for next year's Ryzen chips.

    Is there any news about a smaller Navi? Something at $249 would make a nice upgrade for my 290, finally. Otherwise I'm looking at used Vega stock.

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  • skeevy420
    Senior Member

  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Nah I've not seen more issues than normal. Some are lemons, but some of the new ones are lemons too.

    I usually buy my surplus from the large surplus sellers that dismantle batches of retired company hardware though (that will be obvious from their large quantities or lineup of sold products), not random people that may or may not be "disposing" broken company hardware.
    That's where I sourced for parts to build my current system. Great way to get enterprise grade equipment for very, very cheap.

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  • starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    Do what I did -- "obtain" a copy of Windows 10 LTSB (from Reddit). It's basically Windows 10 Pro with most of the crap that makes Windows 10 Home/Pro suck ass removed.
    Danny3
    Senior Member
    Danny3

    yes I support this too, I've replaced all instances of Windows 10 Home with "Windows 10 Enterprise 2016 LTSB X64 OEM ESD ENU JAN 2019" (wink wink) and it's pretty good.

    Running an unpatched system is just bad and stupid.

    Leave a comment:

  • starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post
    Used power-supplies by self is something I normally avoid.
    Nah I've not seen more issues than normal. Some are lemons, but some of the new ones are lemons too.

    I usually buy my surplus from the large surplus sellers that dismantle batches of retired company hardware though (that will be obvious from their large quantities or lineup of sold products), not random people that may or may not be "disposing" broken company hardware.

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  • skeevy420
    Senior Member

  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by Danny3 View Post

    I've been running Windows 7 with disabled updates for 3 years I think, actually from when Windows 10 was released and Microsoft started pushing junk updates to intentionally break Windows 7 so Windows 10 had a chance to beat it at something.
    So actually I don't care what Microsoft says or does about Windows 7 support, because I don't trust them and I don't install their updates for a long time anyway.
    But still I want good drivers from AMD for it for things like games and video playback with Kodi and MPC-HC, which can use hardware decoding for codecs like H.264 and H.265.
    Linux still has to catch up in the gaming and video playback areas, so until then I plan to use Windows 7 as my favorite Windows version for so many reasons in a dual-boot mode with Linux.
    Do what I did -- "obtain" a copy of Windows 10 LTSB (from Reddit). It's basically Windows 10 Pro with most of the crap that makes Windows 10 Home/Pro suck ass removed. I have a 10 Pro key (my old 7 Pro key) so I don't feel that guilty about "obtaining" the stripped down version and using it. IMHO, LTSB is what 10 Pro should be and all the stuff that 10 Pro adds should be in an "Enhanced Features" branch selectable from either the installer or the system update manager. That system-breaking crap really needs to be opt-in.

    I do find it extremely funny that I alternate between Manjaro & Arch for fast updates, that I despise LTS Linux over a good rolling release model, and yet when it comes to Windows 10 the only version I'll run is their LTS version. Hopefully you'll figure it out Microsoft. It took Arch a while to get it all figured out so I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that you'll eventually get your rolling release model working better. Until then, however, I'm not gonna use it.

    I feel that I should add that I don't normally promote "obtaining" software, but Windows 10 LTSB is one of those exceptions due to the "Pro" version being a continuous beta and untrustworthy.

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  • oiaohm
    Senior Member

  • oiaohm
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Could be a good idea to get a used Delta PSU. They come from prebuilt or routers or servers and can be found used, Delta is one of the best brands for PSUs and power bricks.
    Used power-supplies by self is something I normally avoid. I have worked too much in server setups to know that when we have a powersupply giving us trouble that we cannot diagnose well enough to return to vendor under warranty we sell it off second hand so it someone else problem.

    Its not like you cannot buy Delta(and other high end server/medical brand) PSU units new from the right online stores. The extra 100-200 dollars over the ebay second hand is worth it for the years of head aches getting one of the lemons can cause you.

    Leave a comment:

  • starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    I never said all. Some, but not all.
    You said

    Whenever I see "gaming" I always think "oh, this thing is not 100%-reliable and at some point it will fail when not used for something that is gaming

    That isn't just "some gaming boards".

    Are you sure? If that's the case, then my board would have arrived without this issue in the first place.
    "designed for 100% stable operation" != "perfect quality control"

    also

    "designed for 100% stable operation" != "no design errors"

    As I said, lemons or even whole bad board models can happen. But that's an issue limited to specific boards (lemons) or board models (design errors), but no manufacturer willingly designs PC boards to become unstable after a few hours, that's just silly.

    This happened to Supermicro and Asrock Rack boards too, which is expensive server hardware, which ought to be kept at higher standards than consumer hardware.

    Then there was a whole clusterfuck of massive RMA and whining when Intel themselves made some Atom lineups with hardware defects and these CPUs will break after a year of 24/7 use, and this was also an issue for server boards because there were some Atom-derived server CPUs (Avoton) soldered to the board, so the whole system would just stop working and you would have to RMA a 300$ board+CPU.

    Furthermore, the process for returning defective board is often useless according to many people.
    I don't see the difference with most other consumer products. Here in the EU there are laws that force the seller to accept returns and provide warranty for 2 years for that reason, and even then it's a pain to get most sellers to obey.

    That's one of the reasons Amazon is a thing. They will always accept returns for warranty.

    Yeah, I know that. Even worse, I've been told that Corsair green-label PSUs are bad (which sadly I happen to own).
    Could be a good idea to get a used Delta PSU. They come from prebuilt or routers or servers and can be found used, Delta is one of the best brands for PSUs and power bricks.

    You probably won't be able to get a dual GPU PSU, but it will be at least be reliable.

    Leave a comment:

  • tildearrow
    Senior Member

  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    So, because one board or board model is a lemon (or sucks on Linux, which is something the OEMs never usually test for consumer boards) then all boards of the same category are shit? Nice fucking thinking right there.
    I never said all. Some, but not all.

    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    FYI: it's not normal for any board to just hard-freeze randomly. All PC boards are designed for 100% reliable operation and 24/7 usage. Everyone gets upset when their PC randomly shuts down, not just "workstation users".
    Are you sure? If that's the case, then my board would have arrived without this issue in the first place.
    Furthermore, the process for returning defective board is often useless according to many people.
    But OK, thanks for the info.

    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    What prevented you from upgrading the PSU instead? You thought that consumer PSUs aren't designed for 100% reliable and 24/7 operation too?
    Money. I live in a developing country, which means income isn't that high and we have many priorities which prevent buying a new PSU.

    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Also, random crashing could be very well caused by unstable or overloaded PSU (it does not deliver stable voltage to the system), if suddenly a 12v rail goes down to 10 or 9v then shit is going to happen.
    Yeah, I know that. Even worse, I've been told that Corsair green-label PSUs are bad (which sadly I happen to own).

    Leave a comment:

  • Nille_kungen
    Senior Member

  • Nille_kungen
    replied
    Originally posted by numacross View Post
    How do they do it? They have moved all the IO into a separate die manufactured at 14nm. The processing chiplets are manufactured at 7nm. From
    The IO die is actually 12nm.
    Nille_kungen
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Nille_kungen; 12 June 2019, 03:57 AM.

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