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Raspberry Pi Close To Seeing CPUFreq Support

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  • Raspberry Pi Close To Seeing CPUFreq Support

    Phoronix: Raspberry Pi Close To Seeing CPUFreq Support

    Nicolas Saenz Julienne of SUSE has been working on CPUFreq support for the Raspberry Pi single board computers to allow for the Linux kernel to provide CPU frequency scaling controls...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...CPUFreq-Driver

  • #2
    I thought that it was only amateurs who wasted their time on the raspberry Pi nowadays, given the widespread availability of MUCH more powerful SBCs.
    Not so sure that SUSE-corporate will be excited about having this kind of news--about one of their developers (I assume he's a developer, from his efforts)--spread far and wide.

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    • #3
      You can't argue with 10M+ "deployments" in the hands of amateurs Always great to see upstream work rather than vendor hacks even if for a proprietary non-standard architecture.

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      • #4
        By number of units sold, Raspberry Pis still outsell everything else on the market.
        So it's worth supporting due to the popularity of the device : you'd be contenting a large user base.

        Raspberry Pi (3 and higher) are among of the officially supported platform for testing openSUSE on ARM64.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post
          I thought that it was only amateurs who wasted their time on the raspberry Pi nowadays, given the widespread availability of MUCH more powerful SBCs.
          Not so sure that SUSE-corporate will be excited about having this kind of news--about one of their developers (I assume he's a developer, from his efforts)--spread far and wide.
          Apparently someone who thinks raw cpu performance is the only worthy metric.

          If you have a job that only requires a certain amount of cpu performance and you can get a $35 device to do it....why in the world would you spend more.

          If you want to spend the minimum amount of time mucking around with software to get something deployed...why in the world would you spend more time on a board that is not as well supported.

          I have some relatively fast arm boards with 4G memory for building code...and then I have pi's for deployments that require no where near as much performance. The typical constant CPU load I have on my deployed Mycroft PIs is 40%, averaging 10% per core. I don't need faster cores here. My OctoPrint pi's are using ~2% cpu load, I don't need faster cores here either.

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          • #6
            I wonder when the mainline kernel for RPi will support SPI. It's the only reason I own a pi, and I was disappointed that I had to switch to an ancient proprietary armv7 kernel just to run flashrom.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by LoveRPi View Post
              You can't argue with 10M+ "deployments" in the hands of amateurs Always great to see upstream work rather than vendor hacks even if for a proprietary non-standard architecture.
              I wonder how many of these are just laying in drawers after someone completed their blinking LED project. I'm assuming that number is quite high.

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              • #8
                I think it is worth pointing out there are SBCs that are arguably a better value than an RPi, however, the RPi will remain a very enticing option due to the vast community. Even though I tend to buy odroid products, I often find myself using stuff made by the RPi community.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                  I think it is worth pointing out there are SBCs that are arguably a better value than an RPi, however, the RPi will remain a very enticing option due to the vast community.
                  Isn't this (a big) part of the value that the RPi provides?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kobblestown View Post
                    Isn't this (a big) part of the value that the RPi provides?
                    Yes, that was my point - the community (which includes all of the shields and other hardware mods) is what gives the RPi its value. Without that, there's no reason to buy them since there are devices out there that are either faster, cheaper, smaller, or any combination of those.

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