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Linux 5.1 Getting A Minor Spectre V2 Retpolines Optimization For Select Instances

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  • #11
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Why the fuck are you always dropping completely unrelated buzzwords lately?

    How in the name of Jeezus are you relating the current situation, which is just choosing compile-time options of Linux kernel, to dependency hell.

    Do you even know what is a Linux kernel, or what is dependency hell?
    WTF are you flipping for? Did you even see what I quoted? You said that compiling the kernel is not so difficult, and yes it's not because it doesn't have many dependencies, which is what I said and agreed with.

    Try compiling a package like ffmpeg without a package manager with ALL encoders/decoders/demuxers (let's say you want to compile all libs with -flto or custom options, w/e) and compile everything from source by grabbing them yourself, then go fucking talk to me about knowing what "dependency hell" is. I didn't mean the literal sense, it's still hell even if just for building.
    Last edited by Weasel; 03-08-2019, 05:44 PM.

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    • #12
      Weasel

      SDL and SDL related if not compiled with forethought can quickly turn into dependency hell. I don''t have time for source based or heavy compiling oriented distributions these days. Of course you don't need one of those to build your own custom kernel. The only dependency hell you can run into is module or driver built-ins and how they are related and what needs the other in the kernel configuration for a given module or built-in but still is not a true dependency hell, like building a bunch of libraries with restricted functionality compiling an app that requires libraries compiled with the latest well you get the idea, having to re-compile a ton of stuff with updated libraries so you can have the most latest stable version of a given app. Now that is dependency hell 100% true nightmare if you are are using slack want the newer version of a specific app. Either that or you can just settle with an older stable version or settle with older libraries and older software.

      Sometimes staying with much older software pays off in the long run, especially if your not pick pick picky.

      I am on Manjaro though so you can dis my disco if you wan't, stuff seems to be working astonishingly well for how up to date app versions are.

      What was the original subject? Where was I oh yea subject kernel 5.1 never mind my bad.
      Last edited by creative; 03-09-2019, 08:36 AM.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Weasel View Post
        You said that compiling the kernel is not so difficult, and yes it's not because it doesn't have many dependencies, which is what I said and agreed with.
        Dependency hell is not "having a lot of dependencies", it's "having conflicts within the dependencies". Only some applications have that issue, so you have it reversed.

        Chrome could be like that if you try to build it all from source (and not rely on binary libs they ship or fetch from other places when building).

        I didn't mean the literal sense, it's still hell even if just for building.
        See, that's what I'm saying. Stop giving your own interpretation to things.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Weasel View Post
          Yeah, this. Not much dependency hell.
          Windows has no dependency mechanism and using it is from hell and makes you crazy. Dependencies are defined in Linux kernel Kconfig files. An example:
          https://cateee.net/lkddb/web-lkddb/DVB_CORE.html

          You can remove unneeded drivers easily. The kernel configuration file of Debian Official kernel are available in /boot, named after the kernel release. Copy the .config file to the linux directory. Connect all your devices and run the command: make localmodconfig.

          Use the command make xconfig to manually configure the kernel. Read the built-in documentation and use recommended settings. For more information, see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3AxgH2bbsE

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          • #15
            starshipeleven there are also different kinds of dependency hells. Depending on the library or binary there can also be functionality dependency hells. If you have been compiling from source for a given set of time from a given distributions release date and you start to decide you must have xx.x version of a certain app which happens to be quite a bit newer considering the versions of the libraries it calls for and you must absolutely have that app version then you can have a total cluster f*** getting stuff to work. Usually easier just to wait for the next distributions release or to go with a more hip rolling distro.

            There can also be package management dependency hell's which is another story but far less time consuming.

            When I think of dependency hell, as true dependency hell? It's is when you're compiling a lot of software from source, manually on your own with no automation crap. As I can remember per my own memories with slackware.
            Last edited by creative; 03-08-2019, 11:32 PM.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by creative View Post
              starshipeleven there are also different kinds of dependency hells. Depending on the library or binary there can also be functionality dependency hells. If you have been compiling from source for a given set of time from a given distributions release date and you start to decide you must have xx.x version of a certain app which happens to be quite a bit newer considering the versions of the libraries it calls for and you must absolutely have that app version then you can have a total cluster f*** getting stuff to work. Usually easier just to wait for the next distributions release or to go with a more hip rolling distro.
              Trying to run an application with libraries at older versions is not dependency hell.

              There can also be package management dependency hell's which is another story but far less time consuming.
              This is a dependency hell, although if I understand correctly what you mean, this is more a packaging issue or a package manager failing to install and leaving in an unknown state, than an actual library issue so you can get away with forcing yor way through if the package manager does not suck.

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              • #17
                starshipeleven It is when you are trying to compile much newer libraries than what came with the distribution that you are on or your distribution does not provide a given set of libraries.This was back in 2006 though. I have really not ran into what I would call a dependency hell on any distribution with a modern package manager though. Stuff on modern distributions... nevermind.. Stuff is a lot easier to resolve 'and quite a bit different' than it once was I will just leave it at that and a link to some of what I am talking about giving prime examples of the original forms of dependency hells.

                https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...ke-4175637215/
                Last edited by creative; 03-09-2019, 12:11 AM.

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                • #18
                  starshipeleven Compared to what back in the day I was trying to use and do, right now things like Manjaro are a dream come true lol. Setting up stuff to get a home recording studio functioning like I liked with slackware around 2005 was a challenge. Especially considering some of audio applications with specific versions that I wanted to use. Ardour and Hydrogen were the main centers of interest among other audio related things.

                  When I finally got Ardour running it blew my mind it was so different than cool edit pro in Windows.

                  I was there at Ardours beginning those were very exciting times. I now use Mixbus based off Ardour.
                  Last edited by creative; 03-09-2019, 12:43 AM.

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                  • #19
                    phoronix
                    I am concerned about the performance digressions you found out earlier on Linux 5. Please keep us informed with the latest status on this. Appriciated.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

                      There are millions of home and embedded device users that do nothing with retpoline kernels. As you might see, using retpoline slows your system.
                      But you're asking for a message telling users they've disabled a security feature to be removed - it's a message, most users won't even be checking their logs

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