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Amazon Adds RISC-V Support To FreeRTOS

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  • Amazon Adds RISC-V Support To FreeRTOS

    Phoronix: Amazon Adds RISC-V Support To FreeRTOS

    Amazon AWS has added support for the RISC-V open-source processor architecture to their FreeRTOS kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ISC-V-FreeRTOS

  • #2
    FreeRTOS is kinda interesting isn't it? this is the first time I hear about it... What is the most common use for this?

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    • #3
      AFAIK there has been a RISC-V FreeRTOS port floating around for more than a year now; good to see Amazon upstreaming it though.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by rabcor View Post
        FreeRTOS is kinda interesting isn't it? this is the first time I hear about it... What is the most common use for this?
        In any device requiring a real time operating system: many industrial, medical, and mechanical control devices which must strictly maintain timing constraints on processes. For example, if you have an industrial robot arm, it is likely controlled at some level by an application on an RTOS (possibly even FreeRTOS, as it is popular).

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        • #5
          For example RTEMS, another open source RTOS, is powering the Electra radio systems used by Mars probes in orbit to relay data from landers on the surface back to Earth.

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          • #6
            I would like to see Ubuntu Core and Fedora Atomic ported to RISC-V.
            Maybe Android Things ported to RISC-V.
            And a cheap $35 single-board computer, something like Raspberry Pi but with RISC-V.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              I would like to see Ubuntu Core and Fedora Atomic ported to RISC-V.
              Maybe Android Things ported to RISC-V.
              And a cheap $35 single-board computer, something like Raspberry Pi but with RISC-V.
              RISC-V does not equal open source, nor open hardware. I's highly likely that low end crap hardware isn't going to be much more open than current ARM hardware even if it's using RISC-V cores for their "application processor" (how they call the CPU running Linux).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                I would like to see Ubuntu Core and Fedora Atomic ported to RISC-V.
                Maybe Android Things ported to RISC-V.
                And a cheap $35 single-board computer, something like Raspberry Pi but with RISC-V.
                Work on running Fedora (and thus also Fedora Atomic, which is basically a Fedora variant) on RISC-V is already ongoing:

                Fedora Wiki page about RISC-V progress
                Fosdem 2019 talk about running Fedora on RISC-V

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                • #9
                  I think they should have called this board... Frankenstein
                  1 cortex M0
                  1 cortex m4
                  2 riscv processors, one for aplications and the other for radio..

                  Why they haven't joined also a 2 mips32 and 2 x86?

                  You already have a zerorisc as a microcontroller and a bigger core for applications...why the 2 ARM processors?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rabcor View Post
                    FreeRTOS is kinda interesting isn't it? this is the first time I hear about it... What is the most common use for this?

                    A real-time operating system (an 'RTOS') is absolutely essential in situations where tasks must be performed on a precise schedule, and not on a "...oh, OK, I'll do it next time there's an opportunity to do it...". Most people don't realize that this latter case is how most all operating systems work. And this is the reason an RTOS is referred to--sometimes--as 'deterministic'; tasks are performed in a highly predictable, deterministic, "exactly-on-schedule" manner.
                    This is absolutely no situation for a “Raspberry-Pi-running-Raspbian" (or any other ‘standard’ Linux OS, for that matter).

                    AWS is providing a very exciting opportunity and resource which has been desperately neded fpr a very long time.
                    Simply follow Michael Larabel's 'hyperlinks' to see a list of the very large corporate 'names' which are behind this effort.

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