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AMD Dual EPYC 7601 Benchmarks - 9-Way AMD EPYC / Intel Xeon Tests On Ubuntu 18.10 Server

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  • AMD Dual EPYC 7601 Benchmarks - 9-Way AMD EPYC / Intel Xeon Tests On Ubuntu 18.10 Server

    Phoronix: AMD Dual EPYC 7601 Benchmarks - 9-Way AMD EPYC / Intel Xeon Tests On Ubuntu 18.10 Server

    Arriving earlier this month was a Dell PowerEdge R7425 server at Phoronix that was equipped with two AMD EPYC 7601 processors, 512GB of RAM, and 20 Samsung 860 EVO SSDs to make for a very interesting test platform and our first that is based on a dual EPYC design with our many other EPYC Linux benchmarks to date being 1P. Here is a look at the full performance capabilities of this 64-core / 128-thread server compared to a variety of other AMD EPYC and Intel Xeon processors while also doubling as an initial look at the performance of these server CPUs on Ubuntu 18.10.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26973

  • #2
    Wow, AMD EPYC mopped the floor with Xeon, really impressive. Anyone shopping for new servers would be a fool to not pick EPYC.

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    • #3
      And even with all Intel's academic and anti-amd discounts, amd is still massively cheaper for the same amount of compute. Looks like Intel is really going to have some difficult years ahead ...

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      • #4
        INTEL IS KILL!!1!

        Good, now if AMD could deliver with GPU as well pls

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        • #5
          It would be interesting if a single core benchmark (like PassMark) could be added to the Phoronix Benchmarks since single core performance can be vital for some of us while also being interested in the scalability of multiple cores.

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          • #6
            Great test!

            F.Ultra, why would you buy any of these CPUs if you would care about single core performance? A Ryzen 2700X will be faster than an Epyc on single core.

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            • #7
              I think it's important to emphasize that the worst CPUs in these benchmarks have 8c/16t. That's no slouch, and yet it is completely dwarfed by this thing.

              Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post
              It would be interesting if a single core benchmark (like PassMark) could be added to the Phoronix Benchmarks since single core performance can be vital for some of us while also being interested in the scalability of multiple cores.
              I assume what you meant is running a collection of independent single-threaded tasks? Because nobody buys a 128-thread server with the intent of only using 1 thread.

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              • #8
                Epyc domination... That thing should be illegal. Nobody should have that power.
                Last edited by valici; 10-16-2018, 12:20 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                  I think it's important to emphasize that the worst CPUs in these benchmarks have 8c/16t. That's no slouch, and yet it is completely dwarfed by this thing.


                  I assume what you meant is running a collection of independent single-threaded tasks? Because nobody buys a 128-thread server with the intent of only using 1 thread.
                  I'm interested in both the latency of each operation as well as the scalability of performing many operations at the same time. The current benchmarks only show the total throughput of the system and not the latency. In my industry we need to both minimize the latency (single core performance) as well as being able to scale to many connections (say running 128 threads simultaneously).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ypnos View Post
                    Great test!

                    F.Ultra, why would you buy any of these CPUs if you would care about single core performance? A Ryzen 2700X will be faster than an Epyc on single core.
                    Because I care not only about the single core performance.

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