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The NVIDIA Jetson TX2 Performance Has Evolved Nicely Since Launch

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  • The NVIDIA Jetson TX2 Performance Has Evolved Nicely Since Launch

    Phoronix: The NVIDIA Jetson TX2 Performance Has Evolved Nicely Since Launch

    Word this week of the NVIDIA Jetson Xavier Development Kit being up for pre-order reminded me of some benchmarks I had been meaning to do of seeing how the NVIDIA Jetson TX2 developer kit's performance has evolved since its launch a year and a half ago. There's actually a quite measurable improvement in performance with the latest software/drivers compared to it was at launch.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26803

  • #2
    I'd like to get one of these but they're just so expensive.

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    • #3
      Priced just so that it's too expensive for you.
      The older X1 is available at consumer prices in the Shield TV and Nintendo Switch, TX2 really is meant for devs only. Like the Mac Mini if we can be snark.

      These are the Quadros of ARM boards.

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      • #4
        Wish more ARM boards ran mainline Linux

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        • #5
          Jetson TX1 Developer Kit SE costs $199/€239. That's less expensive than many boards from 96boards and with real Linux support.

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          • #6
            Does the Jetson TX2 have NVLinks somewhere?
            I'd like a full (and free, preferably) NVLink IP block to integrate into super fast FPGA's.
            That would enable me to move some serious data into the GPU.
            PCIe is just not fast enough.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by grok View Post
              These are the Quadros of ARM boards.
              That's a good way of looking at it.

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              • #8
                I have a question regarding the Denver cores: How often are the benchmarks run? As far as I know a software layers optimizes the code fed to the cores which are very wide in-order designs. Processing speed should grow with each iteration until it hits a maximum.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Girolamo_Cavazzoni View Post
                  I have a question regarding the Denver cores: How often are the benchmarks run? As far as I know a software layers optimizes the code fed to the cores which are very wide in-order designs. Processing speed should grow with each iteration until it hits a maximum.
                  I believe the answer is 42.
                  That is the number when maximum number crunching has occurred.

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                  • #10
                    I thought likewise, it just made most sense to me.

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