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Noctua NH-D9 DX-3647 4U: A High-End Xeon Scalable Heatsink

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  • Noctua NH-D9 DX-3647 4U: A High-End Xeon Scalable Heatsink

    Phoronix: Noctua NH-D9 DX-3647 4U: A High-End Xeon Scalable Heatsink

    Back in March we looked at the cooling performance of Noctua's AMD EPYC heatsinks for cooling these Zen-based server processors. The Noctua heatsinks tested did a wonderful job testing those socket SP3 processors so when the Austrian company announced a few weeks ago their Xeon Scalable heatsink line-up, we decided it would be interesting to see how their latest Intel server heatsinks perform.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26518

  • #2
    But can it do 5GHz?

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    • #3
      With the reduced price of water coolers these days I don't see much reason to buy traditional heatsink coolers other than lowest cost. No idea if they exist for Xeon scalable since I'm not in the market for one.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by zeroepoch View Post
        With the reduced price of water coolers these days I don't see much reason to buy traditional heatsink coolers other than lowest cost. No idea if they exist for Xeon scalable since I'm not in the market for one.
        For some even a small risk of liquid-related damage is unacceptable.

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        • #5
          Noctua is a great company. I fully endorse their products. But explain how are they expensive exactly? $90 is a rounding error when you look at some of the Epyc or high-end Xeon prices (that will need such cooling).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by zeroepoch View Post
            With the reduced price of water coolers these days I don't see much reason to buy traditional heatsink coolers other than lowest cost. No idea if they exist for Xeon scalable since I'm not in the market for one.
            There isn't much reason to buy watercoolers too. They are more or less even as far as performance goes, up to high-midrange coolers (for overclocking).

            It mostly falls down to personal preference over minor things.

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            • #7
              Upon seeing it's not a direct-touch heat pipe design, I was rather expecting it to employ a vapor chamber. Nothing on their site about that, so most likely not. I wonder how much benefit (and cost) it would add.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by zeroepoch View Post
                With the reduced price of water coolers these days I don't see much reason to buy traditional heatsink coolers other than lowest cost. No idea if they exist for Xeon scalable since I'm not in the market for one.
                You probably mean those "all-in-one", "closed-loop-coolers". Those are not better than a good tower-style air-cooler. You can get similar performance out of one of the very large air-coolers as what you get with a large 240mm CLC. What can sabotage this is bad air-flow in the case and not enough case fans to feed fresh air to the air-cooler. In comparison, the CLC can be mounted so that it gets its air directly from the outside, so it'll always work great. The good thing I see about an air-cooler is that there's nothing about the cooler itself that can break, while with the CLC there's the pump to worry about.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lem79 View Post
                  But can it do 5GHz?
                  I didn't see 4 mini coolers and a heatsink with heatpipes around the motherboard VRMs, so no.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by coder View Post
                    Upon seeing it's not a direct-touch heat pipe design, I was rather expecting it to employ a vapor chamber. Nothing on their site about that, so most likely not. I wonder how much benefit (and cost) it would add.
                    Direct-touch is a cost saving measure. A copper base plate soldered onto the heat-pipes like in this Noctua cooler here is slightly better performance than direct-touch.

                    About vapor chambers, I think I've only seen that from CoolerMaster. Their coolers which tried to use vapor chambers were all testing worse than the more boring coolers from manufacturers like Phanteks, Noctua, Thermalright, Cryorig. It seems using a copper base plus soldered heat-pipes is the best you can do, and any change just makes things worse.

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