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A Look At How The AMD EPYC Linux Performance Has Evolved Over The Past Year

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  • A Look At How The AMD EPYC Linux Performance Has Evolved Over The Past Year

    Phoronix: A Look At How The AMD EPYC Linux Performance Has Evolved Over The Past Year

    This month marks one year since AMD returned to delivering high-performance server CPUs with the debut of their EPYC 7000 series processor line-up. It's been a triumphant period for AMD with the successes over the past year of their EPYC family. Over the past year, the Linux support has continued to improve with several EPYC/Zen CPU optimizations, ongoing Zen compiler tuning, CPU temperature monitoring support within the k10temp driver, and general improvements to the Linux kernel that have also helped out EPYC. In this article is a comparison of a "2017" Linux software stack as was common last year to the performance now possible if using the bleeding-edge software components. These Linux benchmarks were done with the EPYC 7351P, 7401P, and 7601 processors.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26433

  • #2
    Nice improvement :-). I guess we should see something similar for the desktop Ryzen chips

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    • #3
      Originally posted by EarthMind View Post
      Nice improvement :-). I guess we should see something similar for the desktop Ryzen chips
      I hope so because my 2400g, a brilliant little APU when it works, still blank-screens about half the time on reboot and needs to be reset until it boots. That's with Ubuntu 18.04. Once booted, zero problems, and very snappy performance from the onboard vega graphics. (I'm using a Gigabyte Aorus X370 Gaming K5 motherboard that has had its BIOS updated to April 2018 version).
      Last edited by vegabook; 06-11-2018, 02:01 PM.

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      • #4
        vegabook
        Have you tried a new one:
        Index of ~/kernel-ppa/mainline

        Unfortunately you can't update from this ppa automatically. So you will have 4.17 as long as you don't get a higher version from the standard repos(Which will only happen with a distro upgrade) or until you download a newer one from the kernel-ppa.

        Edit: You can also add the Padoka PPA but it is packaging the development driver branch so it's brand new but perhaps also a bit buggy/less buggy - depends from which perspective you look at it.
        Last edited by oooverclocker; 06-11-2018, 04:46 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by oooverclocker View Post
          Have you tried a new one:
          Index of ~/kernel-ppa/mainline
          Not sure what you are talking about? Testing was done with the latest 4.17 stable kernel.
          Michael Larabel
          http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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          • #6
            Sorry Michael , I was referring to the posting of vegabook. I should have made this clearer.

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            • #7
              Nice gains - minor regressions, what more could you ask for. The regressions make me wonder if the spectra remediations are a factor.

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              • #8
                You need the absolute newest kernels and libs to get the APUs functioning correctly. Im not familiar enough with Ubuntu tell you how to go about updating the distro.

                Originally posted by vegabook View Post

                I hope so because my 2400g, a brilliant little APU when it works, still blank-screens about half the time on reboot and needs to be reset until it boots. That's with Ubuntu 18.04. Once booted, zero problems, and very snappy performance from the onboard vega graphics. (I'm using a Gigabyte Aorus X370 Gaming K5 motherboard that has had its BIOS updated to April 2018 version).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                  You need the absolute newest kernels and libs to get the APUs functioning correctly. Im not familiar enough with Ubuntu tell you how to go about updating the distro.


                  I'll probably try Fedora

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vegabook View Post

                    I hope so because my 2400g, a brilliant little APU when it works, still blank-screens about half the time on reboot and needs to be reset until it boots. That's with Ubuntu 18.04. Once booted, zero problems, and very snappy performance from the onboard vega graphics. (I'm using a Gigabyte Aorus X370 Gaming K5 motherboard that has had its BIOS updated to April 2018 version).
                    You could try disabling modesetting (nomodeset in grub) which makes the freeze problem completely go away, but then you loose modesetting and not entirely sure if 3d accel fully works (seemed to work, but can not be sure).

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