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AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Performance Boosted By Updated BIOS/AGESA

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  • Azpegath
    replied
    Isn't the ThreadRipper relevant as a comparison as well? At least for the pure CPU tests?

    Leave a comment:


  • Filiprino
    replied
    Wow, these are impressive improvements.
    It is a pitty that review sites rarely do any updates on their articles with new software releases.

    Leave a comment:


  • emeric
    replied
    I also have 90° on idle with k10 temp.
    Also, my GPU fans are 100%, both on windows or linux, as soon as the login manager start (so I guess as soon as the nvidia driver starts). And that's highly annoying... Asus x470 pro / 2700x and an "old" 970GTX phantom.

    Leave a comment:


  • shmerl
    replied
    Originally posted by SemiLucid View Post
    Michael would you mind doing some testing for the soft lockup bug on the new Ryzen chips?

    https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=196683
    I didn't get any since I installed it yesterday. But that's of course not very conclusive yet. Both core and package C6 are enabled.

    Leave a comment:


  • SemiLucid
    replied
    Michael would you mind doing some testing for the soft lockup bug on the new Ryzen chips?

    https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=196683

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Those are some pretty good improvements, considering the performance of this CPU was already pretty good. Assuming this affects all OSes, kinda sucks for AMD, since that means a lot of people have already made their first impressions.

    I assume this has no impact on 1st gen Ryzens? For me, the latest AGESA update improved my OC stability, but I haven't noticed if anything was running faster.

    Leave a comment:


  • shmerl
    replied
    Originally posted by dungeon View Post
    Yeah, new AGESA could feel like entirely different CPU Diff is so big really, that it looks like all reviewers should review these Ryzens AG(ESA)AIN

    Of course if this is not just Micheal's isolated case
    What exactly changed though?

    Leave a comment:


  • dungeon
    replied
    Yeah, new AGESA could feel like entirely different CPU Diff is so big really, that it looks like all reviewers should review these Ryzens AG(ESA)AIN

    Of course if this is not just Micheal's isolated case
    Last edited by dungeon; 24 April 2018, 02:09 PM.

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by davidbepo View Post
    a important part of amd processor firmware, its version is used to determine how new is the bios as the bios is based on it, there are more technically correct or advanced explanations but as a user thats all you need to know
    As a user you should also know that the AGESA is related to the CPU/APU performance and other low-level features like C-states and power management (which means a different AGESA can overclock differently and issues on such low-level hardware features can be fixed or introduced with an AGESA update).
    Last edited by starshipeleven; 24 April 2018, 01:58 PM.

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  • shmerl
    replied
    The sole public change listed is updating to AGESA 1.0.0.2a.
    Weird numbering, since previous AGESA was something 1.0.0.7x.

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