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Coreboot Now Has Basic UEFI Support Working With TianoCore

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  • Coreboot Now Has Basic UEFI Support Working With TianoCore

    Phoronix: Coreboot Now Has Basic UEFI Support Working With TianoCore

    Those not regularly using Coreboot may have not realized that it didn't yet have UEFI support, but now it does...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...t-UEFI-Support

  • #2
    Too bad no real hardware is supported.
    There is limited support for some old server hardware, and limited support for some old IBM ThinkPad.

    Too bad there is no support for the Dell XPS 13. Or some Kaby Lake or Ryzen desktop.
    Last edited by uid313; 08-12-2017, 07:38 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      Too bad no real hardware is supported.
      Most modern supported stuff is Chromebooks, Ivy bridge Thinkpads and some similar AMD laptops, and server motherboards running Opterons that still are still high end if compared to consumer hardware.

      This isn't Libreboot, the situation isn't as bad. Sure it may seem for you that MUST USE THE LATESTESTEST stuff for no real reason.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        Ivy bridge Thinkpads and some similar AMD laptops,
        And this support is mostly limited to the absolute minimum. No standby, no powermanagment or other features that we have since 20 years.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Nille View Post

          And this support is mostly limited to the absolute minimum. No standby, no powermanagment or other features that we have since 20 years.
          You are ill informed. Most platforms supported in coreboot (except for the much older ones) do support S3 and power management (ACPI).
          And those features you mention have little to do with UEFI.
          Last edited by avph; 08-12-2017, 03:47 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by avph View Post
            You are ill informed.
            Maybe, but on systems that can do suspend and resume, you has other problems. and except from some old thinkpads, there is no real hardware where you can use it. and even on the thinkpads you has drawbacks.

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            • #7
              Running coreboot fine on my Thinkpad T420. Coreboot allowed me to upgrade to an Ivy Bridge cpu (i7-3632QM) and wifi AC card (Lenovo's BIOS has some idiotic PCIe whitelist..). Nothing to complain, even suspend and resume works.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by iDont View Post
                Running coreboot fine on my Thinkpad T420. Coreboot allowed me to upgrade to an Ivy Bridge cpu (i7-3632QM) and wifi AC card (Lenovo's BIOS has some idiotic PCIe whitelist..). Nothing to complain, even suspend and resume works.
                Wait... Are you saying switching over to Coreboot allows people to upgrade to Ivy Bridge?

                Would it work for other brands, like Dell for instance ? (Let's just imagine that someone adds some Sandy Bridge Dell laptops to Coreboot's compatible models.)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nille View Post

                  Maybe, but on systems that can do suspend and resume, you has other problems. and except from some old thinkpads, there is no real hardware where you can use it. and even on the thinkpads you has drawbacks.
                  I can use it fine on my Dell Chromebook 13 running Solus (Linux). It has Coreboot and SeaBIOS by default and this is real, modern hardware.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Nille View Post

                    Maybe, but on systems that can do suspend and resume, you has other problems. and except from some old thinkpads, there is no real hardware where you can use it. and even on the thinkpads you has drawbacks.
                    I have coreboot on both my PC, a Thinkpad X220 and a Sapphire Pure Platinum H61, everything works perfectly without any issue (and, on the Sapphire even better than the original BIOS, where some power management things were not working correctly). I agree, they're not latest generation hardware, but my i7-3770 is enough for everything I need.

                    coreboot is not one of the project for which you buy a random PC and then check if there's support for it, if you want a coreboot PC you have to buy a coreboot-compatible one. And if you want modern hardware just buy a Chromebook or a Librem.

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