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Gigabyte AB350N-GAMING WiFi: An Ideal Mini-ITX Ryzen Motherboard For Linux

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  • Gigabyte AB350N-GAMING WiFi: An Ideal Mini-ITX Ryzen Motherboard For Linux

    Phoronix: Gigabyte AB350N-GAMING WiFi: An Ideal Mini-ITX Ryzen Motherboard For Linux

    For those drawn by the performance of AMD's Ryzen processors for its performance/value and thinking about building a Kodi/HTPC media box for the living room, a Steam Linux gaming PC / DIY Steam Box, or just want a small form factor PC, Gigabyte's AB350N-GAMING WiFi is a mini-ITX motherboard that plays fine with Linux and offers a lot of functionality for its small size.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=25041

  • #2
    It's far froom ideal, at least for casually gaming Linux user. Upcoming AM4 platform is to have strong graphic parts in its upcoming APU lineup.
    IIRC Raven Ridge should be able to drive 3 or even 4 DP outputs at full bandwidth. Mini ITX board with maximal number of DP outputs would be ideal choice for small and economic option for several 4K monitors...

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    • #3
      BTW, I don't know how many people have noticet that, but at least Mindfactory has on offer A10-9xxx and A12-9xxx Excavator based AM4 APUs at decent prices.
      €100ish for A12-9800 aint bad...

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      • #4
        Can you run this headless?

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        • #5
          Michael, you should look into focusing on ITX more often. You could probably fit twice as many PCs in your racks that way, while probably reducing power consumption of each platform by a handful of watts.


          My Ryzen build has the Biostar X370GTN. So far the only thing that doesn't seem to work in Linux are the RGB headers, which I have set to cycle automatically anyway. For anyone who doesn't need wifi, that board is a decent option. The Gigabyte board is good if you don't use a tower heatsink; the power connectors are inconveniently placed for those. Otherwise the Asrock B350 board seems to be the best at the moment.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DragonDaddyBear View Post
            Can you run this headless?
            And speaking of server functionality :
            does this motherboard support ECC DIMM ?
            (e.g.: The B350-based micro-ATX from ASUS is reported to support ECC - it's enabled in the EFI firmware)

            That kind of functionality makes this kind of mini-boards very useful for NAS.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DrYak View Post
              And speaking of server functionality :
              does this motherboard support ECC DIMM ?
              (e.g.: The B350-based micro-ATX from ASUS is reported to support ECC - it's enabled in the EFI firmware)

              That kind of functionality makes this kind of mini-boards very useful for NAS.
              I don't see why it wouldn't work. ECC support largely depends upon the memory controller, which is part of the CPU, and all Ryzens support ECC. However, I don't know for a fact if it does. The Biostar board I use apparently supports ECC.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DragonDaddyBear View Post
                Can you run this headless?
                I'm currently running an AsRock A320M-DGS headlessly, although you have to find the option in the BIOS to kill the F1 "Confirm no monitor connected" horse shit. Otherwise runs smoothly

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                  ECC support largely depends upon the memory controller, which is part of the CPU, and all Ryzens support ECC.
                  depends on the memory controller (nearly 100% of all AMD CPUs) and :
                  - on the firmware actually turning the feature "on" (though this specific thing might be done by the kernel later during the boot)
                  - the motherboard actually having the extra traces (72 instead of 64 per DIMM - i.e.: not only data but also checksum).

                  Which is entirely up to the motherboard manufacturer.
                  - Some don't even bother (no ECC available)
                  - Some at least have the traces and advertise the feature in the EFI, but don't thoroughly test it. It's a "use at your own risk" feature.
                  So usually if you want ECC DIMM on a consumer level build, you need to rely on people testing. (and eventually the motherboard manufacturer fixing the reported bugs)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DrYak View Post
                    So usually if you want ECC DIMM on a consumer level build, you need to rely on people testing. (and eventually the motherboard manufacturer fixing the reported bugs)
                    Or go for a reputable vendor like AsRock with ECC modules on their QVL (http://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/X370%20...dex.asp#Memory)

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