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Coreboot Ready To Ship On Upcoming Purism Librem 13/15 Laptops

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by nomadewolf View Post
    I get that alot.
    Is it some kind of bug?
    Yeah, it's the forum software's antispam system. It blocks posts it thinks are suspicious until Michael can see them and decide. The algorithm is apparently stupid and there are false positives. It was much worse a few months ago until Michael did something about it, but it seems it worsened lately.

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  • nomadewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    aaand unapproved post for nomadewolf above
    I get that alot.
    Is it some kind of bug?

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by cRaZy-bisCuiT View Post
    What's the point of those notebooks if they're not 100 % blob-free?
    They do the best they can realistically do. 100% blob free is not possible with anything remotely new and performing. x86 of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    aaand unapproved post for nomadewolf above

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by nomadewolf View Post
    All i'm saying is: same conditions applied, you do get more of an Intel processor.
    And I'm saying that I need mobility AND a iGPU that does not totally suck, not just mobility. Of course I don't game when I don't have access to a wall plug. Good luck playing XCOM 1 with an Intel iGPU.

    A bit off topic, but while you don't value discrete graphics much on a laptop, i would love for external graphics cards to be a thing. While keeping all my data in the same device, it would have mobility when i need it. Power if i'm at home, where i could also plug in an external monitor, keyboard, etc.
    Just to illustrate that different people have different needs and one size doesn't fit all.
    I would like that too if I could place a decent desktop processor in the laptop or at the very least a high-end mobile i7 (which is an actual quadcore with hyperthreading) without paying 2k for the laptop.

    It's dumb to pair a discrete GPU to a ULV processor like 99.9% of i5/i7 in modern laptops (or on an A10-A12 for that matter), the CPU will bottleneck you and you'll still pay like decent gaming rig anyway (because laptops with thunderbolt or M.2 ports ain't that cheap + cost of enclosure + PSU that you would pay anyway for the rig).

    Also, OpenSUSE KDE sucks at detecting an external screen (I'm seriously considering making a script to hook to a key so I can kick it brutally in "desktop screen on and integrated screen off or reverse").

    Currently I just use Synchthing to sync data between devices when I get home and use the desktop.

    Leave a comment:


  • cRaZy-bisCuiT
    replied
    What's the point of those notebooks if they're not 100 % blob-free?

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  • nomadewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    My laptop lasts around the same in the benchmark they used here where a laptop with switchable graphics (mine is also a HP envy 15) http://www.techradar.com/reviews/pc-...97108/review/2

    Although I replaced the HDD with a SSD.

    And for the sake of stating the obvious, battery life is more a design decision than anything. My laptop could fit easily a 6-cell li-poly battery instead of a 3-cell one (same as most of their lineup anyway) without changing the chassis design and it would last a full day.
    All i'm saying is: same conditions applied, you do get more of an Intel processor. Furthermore Intel has those ULV Processors, which aren't nothing to write home about regarding performance, but paired with an SSD to well enough and you get even moar battery. For those people that travel alot or that are just lazy to plug it into the wall it's the best choice.

    Personally, i don't really care much about battery life. All i need the the option to be able to move it easily between rooms. So while AMD is good enough for me and you, it might not be everyone's cup of tea, and that is normal IMO.


    A bit off topic, but while you don't value discrete graphics much on a laptop, i would love for external graphics cards to be a thing. While keeping all my data in the same device, it would have mobility when i need it. Power if i'm at home, where i could also plug in an external monitor, keyboard, etc.
    Just to illustrate that different people have different needs and one size doesn't fit all.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by nomadewolf View Post
    While i share your enthusiasm fo AMD, i have to point out your flawed logic when you say you value battery life and want an AMD A10 rpocessor on a laptop...
    My laptop lasts around the same in the benchmark they used here where a laptop with switchable graphics (mine is also a HP envy 15) http://www.techradar.com/reviews/pc-...97108/review/2

    Although I replaced the HDD with a SSD.

    And for the sake of stating the obvious, battery life is more a design decision than anything. My laptop could fit easily a 6-cell li-poly battery instead of a 3-cell one (same as most of their lineup anyway) without changing the chassis design and it would last a full day.

    Leave a comment:


  • nomadewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    They would still not register on my radar. AMD A10-8700p in my laptop is perfectly fine for normal laptop use, some compilation (LEDE firmware) and some light gaming (also runs XCOM 1 for example), even if it is hobbled by single-channel RAM and 15w of TDP.

    I will never buy a laptop with dedicated graphics as I will likely never need that much power (nor I feel like having to deal with total shit linux support for dual graphics that isn't using NVIDIA's blob) and I prefer higher mobility and battery life.

    AMD's laptop stuff has a good enough IGPU for my needs (Intel's are meh) while not sacrificing significant amounts of CPU for that.

    Maybe not in mobile workstations, but in consumer laptops the main reason it isn't competitive is that idiot OEMs shovel them in single-channel boards and mount them in the same chassis they use for Intel's U processors so the power distribution and the cooling system can't handle more than 15 watts so they hobble them by using their 15w tdp mode.

    If the laptops could actually handle a 35 watt APU which is the actual power these APU were designed for, the CPU would have much more headroom for staying in boost clock speeds, same for iGPU. And the laptop would run better while still consuming less than a hybrid graphics laptop with a bullshit low-end semi-useless NVIDIA "dedicated" card like 930 or something.
    While i share your enthusiasm fo AMD, i have to point out your flawed logic when you say you value battery life and want an AMD A10 rpocessor on a laptop...
    An A10 APU is more than enough performance wise. But if battery life is a factor, Intel is the only way to go, unfortuantely.
    Hopefully soon we get Ryzen APUs on laptops and all that changes...

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post
    They could instead go the MacBook Pro route and do discrete AMD with Intel, at least at the larger form-factors.
    They would still not register on my radar. AMD A10-8700p in my laptop is perfectly fine for normal laptop use, some compilation (LEDE firmware) and some light gaming (also runs XCOM 1 for example), even if it is hobbled by single-channel RAM and 15w of TDP.

    I will never buy a laptop with dedicated graphics as I will likely never need that much power (nor I feel like having to deal with total shit linux support for dual graphics that isn't using NVIDIA's blob) and I prefer higher mobility and battery life.

    AMD's laptop stuff has a good enough IGPU for my needs (Intel's are meh) while not sacrificing significant amounts of CPU for that.

    I don't think AMD is really very competitive in mobile workstations right now, even if I wish it were so.
    Maybe not in mobile workstations, but in consumer laptops the main reason it isn't competitive is that idiot OEMs shovel them in single-channel boards and mount them in the same chassis they use for Intel's U processors so the power distribution and the cooling system can't handle more than 15 watts so they hobble them by using their 15w tdp mode.

    If the laptops could actually handle a 35 watt APU which is the actual power these APU were designed for, the CPU would have much more headroom for staying in boost clock speeds, same for iGPU. And the laptop would run better while still consuming less than a hybrid graphics laptop with a bullshit low-end semi-useless NVIDIA "dedicated" card like 930 or something.

    Leave a comment:

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