Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Intel Working On Thunderbolt Security Levels For Linux, Firmware Updates

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    So many creative new ways to get PCI-E outside of the box. ExpressCard, NVMe M.2, Thunderbolt, who knows what's next.

    Comment


    • #12
      Originally posted by Zan Lynx View Post
      Intel has 40 Gbps Ethernet which I'm told is essentially Thunderbolt masquerading as Ethernet, although I'm not sure if you can connect one to a Thunderbolt port. It's all ridiculously high speed serial data transmission.
      Actually it's not related to Thunderbolt at all. The connector used here is called QSFP+ which allows different types of transceivers (for fiber or electrical). It might be possible though to implement fast networking over Thunderbolt similar to IPoIB (IP over Infiniband).

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by RussianNeuroMancer View Post
        I have couple of tablets with Thunderbolt (Dell 5855 and Dell 9250). And as far I can tell Thunderbolt-based docks (like Dell TB16) is more useful than USB3.1-based docks (like Dell WD15). With Thunderbolt you can connect more displayes with higher resolution and/or refresh rate.
        Do you have Thunderbolt3 displays? I only thought one existed. If not you are just using DisplayPort which USB-C already fully supports without help from ThunderBolt.

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by carewolf View Post
          If not you are just using DisplayPort which USB-C already fully supports without help from ThunderBolt.
          Can you connect three FHD displays or couple of 4K by using only USB-C? At 60 Hz (or more) of course.
          Last edited by RussianNeuroMancer; 05-24-2017, 12:49 AM.

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by RussianNeuroMancer View Post
            Can you connect three FHD displays or couple of 4K by using only USB-C? At 60 Hz (or more) of course.
            USB-C switches to displayPort protocol and so do ThunderBolt unless you have a rare ThunderBolt monitor, so it depends on the DisplayPort standard supported by your GPU and monitor.

            Comment


            • #16
              I want to point out that USB-C by itself does not support DisplayPort or Thunderbolt. What it does support is alternate modes, which lets OTHER systems use the USB-C port for their data streams.

              If you have a USB-C add-in card, it won't do anything but USB. It may have internal ports for connecting DP or Thunderbolt, but that isn't required.

              USB-C built in to a laptop will most likely have everything else the laptop supports wired in.

              USB-C built into a desktop board will likely only provide DisplayPort video from the integrated GPU. It might support copying the frame buffer from a discrete GPU, like Optimus does.

              Comment

              Working...
              X