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Many EFI Updates Prepped For Linux 4.7 Kernel

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  • #11
    @caligula:
    Short version until my longer post gets approved:
    - EFI (and coreboot) handles a lot peculiarity (simply load a file from a partition) that aren't handled by simpler firmware and need to be handled by the boot loader.
    - ARM64 will get used in things bigger than a raspberry pi. things like laptops and servers where a full featured firmware like EFI (or Coreboot) makes more sense.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by DrYak View Post
      @caligula:
      Short version until my longer post gets approved:
      - EFI (and coreboot) handles a lot peculiarity (simply load a file from a partition) that aren't handled by simpler firmware and need to be handled by the boot loader.
      - ARM64 will get used in things bigger than a raspberry pi. things like laptops and servers where a full featured firmware like EFI (or Coreboot) makes more sense.
      Right, I guess it could have its uses in enterprise server systems, but many embedded devices can have two devices, one smaller than 2 TB for booting, and larger storage for.. something else. I was originally considering all the *-Pi products like Orange/Banana/Odroid, also routers with NOR flash.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by caligula View Post
        I was originally considering all the *-Pi products like Orange/Banana/Odroid, also routers with NOR flash.
        ...and you're right: for *those* devices, (U)EFI doesn't make really sense.

        Something like uBoot (or even simpler like Qi - BTW does that thing still exists? I haven't touched my Openmoko FreeRunner the past couple of years) would be better.
        Or a build of Coreboot that strips anything which is not "load kernel from flash media" (so using some minimalist payload as FILO).

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        • #14
          @DrYak

          Bootloaders like GRUB(2) always used the space before the first partition. It was relatively small with the partition scheme used up to Win XP (first partition at sector 63) but after the rise of 4k drives (with emulated 512 byte sectors) it was standard to begin at sector 2048. So the bootloader can take now up to 1 MB in the first stage (before 31 KB). For btrfs you need the new aliginment, otherwise it would be too small. EFI has got none of those restrictions, you can freely chose how huge your EFI partiton should be. But back to ARM: using EFI instead of other ways to boot makes the system more generic, you can use the same way to create live images and use the same installers as you might be already used too. I think this is very nice.

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