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Coreboot Gets Ported To The Lenovo X230 Ultrabook

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Coreboot Gets Ported To The Lenovo X230 Ultrabook

    Coreboot Gets Ported To The Lenovo X230 Ultrabook

    Phoronix: Coreboot Gets Ported To The Lenovo X230 Ultrabook

    The latest Lenovo device picking up unofficial support for booting with Coreboot is the X230...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU3OTM

  • phcoder
    replied
    Originally posted by Xipeos View Post
    AFAIK, this will only be useful to endusers if Lenovo signs a coreboot blob, or if you can manually reprogram the BIOS chip.
    You can manually reprogram firmware chip

    Leave a comment:


  • Xipeos
    replied
    AFAIK, this will only be useful to endusers if Lenovo signs a coreboot blob, or if you can manually reprogram the BIOS chip.

    Leave a comment:


  • Espionage724
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    What is the point of a laptop again?
    I don't suspend or hibernate any of my laptops. I either set them to turn off the screen when I shut the lid, or just shut it down when I'm not using it. S3 not working doesn't even matter to me

    Leave a comment:


  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by zanny View Post
    In theory, though, the even better option would be for linux to be coreboot-aware enough to be able to write into the firmware modifications from userspace to set this stuff, so you can tweak your voltages / cpufreq / ram timings from a live system. I figure the only real safeguard you'd want like that is if you have 3 failed boots in a row or something it resets to the defaults so it can cleanly boot.
    I thought that was the general idea? You already can change a fair amount of things from userland, like overclocking GPUs. Editing UEFI variables is another example of interaction between the firmware and the OS (adding boot entries and changing entry order is not so different from changing any other firmware settings). So it sounds doable.

    Leave a comment:


  • zanny
    replied
    Originally posted by brosis View Post
    Is it possible to actually get the amount of hardware tuning that usual BIOS provides (CPU config, PCI/E config, RAM config) via Coreboot
    Coreboot itself doesn't provide any interactivity at runtime, but you can use a seabios payload or another configuration tool to modify hardware state.

    In theory, though, the even better option would be for linux to be coreboot-aware enough to be able to write into the firmware modifications from userspace to set this stuff, so you can tweak your voltages / cpufreq / ram timings from a live system. I figure the only real safeguard you'd want like that is if you have 3 failed boots in a row or something it resets to the defaults so it can cleanly boot.

    Leave a comment:


  • phcoder
    replied
    Originally posted by brosis View Post
    Is it possible to actually get the amount of hardware tuning that usual BIOS provides (CPU config, PCI/E config, RAM config) via Coreboot?
    coreboot has some number of options. But additionally since you have the *source* you can modify to do anything.
    AFAIK such application exists, its Superiotool and can be found on coreboot site.
    Superiotool is just to communicate with Super I/O which isn't even present on all boards. If the board is already supported then it's in the list of supported boards. If it's not then to estimate how hard it would be to port to it, you should look into its documentation and compare with already supported boards.

    Leave a comment:


  • staalmannen
    replied
    Originally posted by ua=42 View Post
    It would be really nice if they had an application that you could run that would check to see if the chip-sets on your motherboard are theoretically supported and display whether or not someone else has reported success.
    That and having a preconfigured coreboot "distro" with useful payloads (syslinux?). I have long wanted to try coreboot but been afraid because of the potential problems if something goes wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • brosis
    replied
    Is it possible to actually get the amount of hardware tuning that usual BIOS provides (CPU config, PCI/E config, RAM config) via Coreboot?
    Because the main point of BIOS is not so booting or checking system, but setting hardware configuration.

    Originally posted by ua=42 View Post
    It would be really nice if they had an application that you could run that would check to see if the chip-sets on your motherboard are theoretically supported and display whether or not someone else has reported success.
    AFAIK such application exists, its Superiotool and can be found on coreboot site.

    Leave a comment:


  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by ua=42 View Post
    It would be really nice if they had an application that you could run that would check to see if the chip-sets on your motherboard are theoretically supported and display whether or not someone else has reported success.
    Doesn't flashrom already have something of the sort?

    Leave a comment:

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