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SUSE Working To Upstream RP1 Southbridge Linux Driver For The Raspberry Pi 5

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  • SUSE Working To Upstream RP1 Southbridge Linux Driver For The Raspberry Pi 5

    Phoronix: SUSE Working To Upstream RP1 Southbridge Linux Driver For The Raspberry Pi 5

    The Raspberry Pi 5 features the "RP1" as the in-house silicon design for the southbridge to this single board computer. The RP1 driver maintained by Raspberry Pi is just found in their downstream kernel while a SUSE engineer is working to rework that driver so that it can be eventually mainlined in the upstream Linux kernel...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    @Michael

    Typo

    "and in soem cases" should be "some"

    If you aren't really using the GPIO pins then a no-name budget intel mini PC is probably a better option then an a Pi.

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    • #3
      Great work from SUSE, but why wasn't Raspberry Pi working to get this upstreamed themselves?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pWe00Iri3e7Z9lHOX2Qx View Post
        Great work from SUSE, but why wasn't Raspberry Pi working to get this upstreamed themselves?
        I wonder that too. This late to get the hardware upstreamed. If this board was made by Intel it would have full hardware support upstreamed months before the hardware hit the shelves.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pWe00Iri3e7Z9lHOX2Qx View Post
          Great work from SUSE, but why wasn't Raspberry Pi working to get this upstreamed themselves?
          I really think a lot more people need to be asking this question, and loudly.

          The RPi foundation are continually relying on third parties to provide drivers for their hardware (similar story for their GPU drivers). It feels like there's just a little too much of Broadcom's culture still within the RPi Foundation, and I'd really like to see them make better efforts at getting this stuff upstreamed directly into projects like the Linux Kernel, Mesa, etc, and sooner within their development cycles (i.e.: not months/years after hardware is available for sale).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post

            I wonder that too. This late to get the hardware upstreamed. If this board was made by Intel it would have full hardware support upstreamed months before the hardware hit the shelves.
            I am happy SUSE is doing some work, but now that the RPi IPO has happened, there will be zero excuse for the RPi corporation not to upstream BEFORE release of the next generation of board(s) (just like Intel and AMD are *expected* to do). And yet, there will probably still be glowing articles here and elsewhere about the RPi, because, well, we don't want to really treat everyone equally.

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            • #7
              Let's not forget that their use of Broadcom's SoC is the main reason why this chip is even necessary! If they'd use a better SoC, they wouldn't even have had to bother with this!

              I hope their IPO enables them to make their own SoCs and cut ties with Broadcom.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by coder View Post
                I hope their IPO enables them to make their own SoCs and cut ties with Broadcom.
                Now their primary mission is to make shareholders happy. Why spend money on developers to upstream your stuff when others have been doing it for you?
                I believe that IPO made them worse.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mlau View Post
                  Now their primary mission is to make shareholders happy. Why spend money on developers to upstream your stuff when others have been doing it for you?
                  As others have pointed out, they've already leaned on other community members, so what would be new about that?

                  On the other hand, why do you think companies like IBM, Intel, and AMD have their own kernel devs on staff? Why wouldn't that logic also apply to Raspberry Pi?

                  I get the sense than many feel proud of how cynical they can be about it.

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