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ASUS Unveils The Tinker V As Their First RISC-V Board

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Old Grouch View Post
    It could be an interesting target for OpenWrt - with two GigE ports, one faces the WAN, and the other a local switch. Given the cpu specifications, I doubt it could route a full GigE of traffic, but it would be nice to get more RISC-V options for OpenWrt.

    The specifications say it has 1 x microUSB and 1 x microUSB OTG.

    For OpenWrt use, the CAN Bus is superfluous, not so sure about the RS232
    Just to be clear, OpenWrt support for a (different) RISC-V SOC already exists. So it's 'just' a potential additional option.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by unwind-protect View Post

      It would be interesting to know how the GbE ports are connected. Are they USB like on Raspberry Pi?
      The Raspberry Pi 4, unlike previous models, does not have a USB-based Ethernet; It's driven direct by the CPU with a PHY:

      ‚Äčhttps://heise.cloudimg.io/width/712/...db4be588cf.png

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Old Grouch View Post

        POWER10 systems currently require non-free blobs to initialise the modular memory. Not everyone is happy with this. The hope of some is that RISC-V will enable the production of 'blob-free' systems, which is important to some people.

        Phoronix: Binary Blobs Continue To Prove Challenging For POWER10 Plus Very Expensive Motherboards
        "Apparently" P11 wont have the unfortunate set-back that P10 suffers from. If you read the supporting links from the Phoronix posts, especially from the chap who made the case, you'd know.

        P11, however, has a release date of "in the future" as far as I'm aware.
        Hi

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Old Grouch View Post

          POWER10 systems currently require non-free blobs to initialise the modular memory. Not everyone is happy with this. The hope of some is that RISC-V will enable the production of 'blob-free' systems, which is important to some people.

          Phoronix: Binary Blobs Continue To Prove Challenging For POWER10 Plus Very Expensive Motherboards
          Maybe there is something that I'm not aware of, but it seems to me that RISC-V is no more likely to bring a fully FOSS, blob-free architecture than ARM or x86. Just because the ISA is royalty free doesn't mean manufacturers won't sell chips with proprietary microcode and management engines just like everyone else - in fact, it may even make it easier for them licence-wise. The free ISA was a promise of a more lively ecosystem but honestly even that doesn't really seem to be happening, unless you count ultra low end mobile SoCs at $1000 a pop.

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