Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PCI Express 7.0 Specification Announced - Hitting 128 GT/s In 2025

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PCI Express 7.0 Specification Announced - Hitting 128 GT/s In 2025

    Phoronix: PCI Express 7.0 Specification Announced - Hitting 128 GT/s In 2025

    The PCI SIG today announced the PCI Express 7.0 specification that doubles the data rate to 128 GT/s and should be released to members in 2025...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...press-7.0-Spec

  • #2
    I'm going to announce the next PCIe specifications:

    PCIe 8.0: 256 GT/s - 2028
    PCIe 9.0: 512 GT/s - 2031
    PCIe 10.0: 1024 GT/s - 2034

    Come on, it's too early! I don't think there are any consumer PCIe 5.0 devices on the market...
    Last edited by tildearrow; 21 June 2022, 03:24 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      I'm going to announce the next PCIe specifications:

      PCIe 8.0: 256 GT/s - 2028
      PCIe 9.0: 512 GT/s - 2031
      PCIe 10.0: 1024 GT/s - 2034

      Come on, it's too early! I don't think there are any PCIe 5.0 devices on the market...
      Pretty sure Power10 from IBM uses PCIe Gen 5.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by davibu View Post
        Pretty sure Power10 from IBM uses PCIe Gen 5.
        I think tildearrow may have been referring to devices that you can actually buy to plug into a PCIe 5 slot. Intel 12th Gen also supports PCIe5.0, but I have yet to see any device that actually uses it. GPU's have barely made it to Gen 4.0.

        The Power10 also looks like its limited to PCIe5.0 on x8 slots, at least from my brief research.

        Basically at this point its probably only being used experimentally for direct machine to machine communications in the HPC realm? Maybe?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by davibu View Post
          Pretty sure Power10 from IBM uses PCIe Gen 5.
          Clarified my post by adding "consumer".

          Comment


          • #6
            For those interested, here is a relatively recent list of motherboards supporting PCIe5.0: https://www.techreviewer.com/tech-an...upport-pcie-5/

            So far its just Intel that has x86_64 grade PCIe5.0.

            That aside does anyone know of a PCIe5.0 add-in card of any sort yet?

            Comment


            • #7
              Remember when we had ISA and then EISA and VESA Local Bus? Back then the buses were playing catchup to the CPUs. Now the CPUs are playing catchup to the buses.

              Comment


              • #8
                lol in 2032 pc will be a graphic card and maybe some ram, and that should do it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jahimself View Post
                  lol in 2032 pc will be a graphic card and maybe some ram, and that should do it.
                  LOL yes, I look forward to the the Nvidia 6090... comes complete with NVME port and optional cpu socket.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm wondering if the idea (from the industry) isn't to make an excuse to drop support for "legacy" PCIe on new devices to force upgrade of old systems. Like GPUs dropping support for 16x, because it isn't needed any more given the performance of PCIe >4.0. It certainly makes my PCIe 2.0 feel inadequate!

                    There really isn't any obvious use-case that I can see for such bandwidth, at least outside of HPC or scientific data acquisition, perhaps. It would make more sense to keep to a standard, and reduce system costs, or improve robustness rather than over specify and fragment the market. At least until there is a demonstrable need for something better.

                    Remember PCI 32bit/33MHz was the mainstream standard for many years despite being superseded by PCI-X, and unsuitable for high performance GPUs of the era, hence the development of the AGP port. Yet, it was worth having a different interfaces for graphics cards, and workstation/server class hardware for the ubiquity of mainstream devices and compatible motherboards, especially after the bus wars of the 80s.

                    At least PCIe devices are (currently) mostly backwards compatible.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X