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AMD SB-RMI Driver Coming For Linux 5.15

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  • AMD SB-RMI Driver Coming For Linux 5.15

    Phoronix: AMD SB-RMI Driver Coming For Linux 5.15

    AMD continues pushing new code out for Linux in better exposing their platform's capabilities in the open-source world. The latest AMD driver work now queued via "-next" branches for introduction this autumn in Linux 5.15 is SB-RMI sensor support...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...I-Linux-Sensor

  • #2
    Oh yes, sensors...

    Let's hope the guy that says "HWiNFO dev gets everything so Windows is better" on every AMD sensors thread doesn't come back...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      Oh yes, sensors...

      Let's hope the guy that says "HWiNFO dev gets everything so Windows is better" on every AMD sensors thread doesn't come back...
      Can you read? This patch is only for enterprise most likely Epic CPUs which are irrelevant for 99.9% of desktop Linux users.

      And, yes, sensors monitoring under Linux is absolutely insufficient and beyond horrible.

      HWiNFO64 shows almost 40 data points for my Ryzen 7 5800X CPU.

      Under Linux I get this:

      Code:
      k10temp-pci-00c3
      Adapter: PCI adapter
      CPU Primary T Control:  +38.0°C  
      Tdie:                   +38.0°C  
      Tccd1:                  +31.2°C
      What a bad joke.

      And then we have this which makes sensors inaccessible for tens of thousands of users of ASUS motherboards.

      "HWiNFO dev does get everything but I've never said Windows is better. Windows just works [better] for 99.9% of average people out there".

      FTFY.
      Last edited by birdie; 02 August 2021, 06:33 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by birdie View Post

        Can you read? This patch is only for enterprise most likely Epic CPUs which are irrelevant for 99.9% of desktop Linux users.
        For f's-

        Originally posted by birdie View Post
        And, yes, sensors monitoring under Linux is absolutely insufficient and beyond horrible.
        I remember when the it87 driver was being killed....

        Originally posted by birdie View Post
        HWiNFO64 shows almost 40 data points for my Ryzen 7 5800X CPU.

        Under Linux I get this:

        Code:
        k10temp-pci-00c3
        Adapter: PCI adapter
        CPU Primary T Control: +38.0°C
        Tdie: +38.0°C
        Tccd1: +31.2°C
        What a bad joke.
        Start petition for AMD to open up specs of sensors.

        Originally posted by birdie View Post
        "HWiNFO dev does get everything but I've never said Windows is better. Windows just works [better] for 99.9% of average people out there".

        FTFY.
        Because:

        1. Windows existed for longer than Linux (since 1985)
        2. Microsoft pushed hard on campaigns and monopolist practices (AARD code, Halloween documents, EEE) and managed to get on every home user and computer manufacturer on Earth.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          Because:

          1. Windows existed for longer than Linux (since 1985)
          2. Microsoft pushed hard on campaigns and monopolist practices (AARD code, Halloween documents, EEE) and managed to get on every home user and computer manufacturer on Earth.
          Whatever Microsoft did in the long past doesn't excuse Linux and companies which profit from it hard from supporting it properly. Period. AMD, Intel and AMD all do make a killing from Linux. None of these companies support Linux sufficiently. Among those three Intel is the best, NVIDIA and AMD are the worst. And yes I lumped AMD and NVIDIA together because AMD refuses to release specs (MSR registers description) even for their Zen 1 CPUs. AMD GPUs are also inadequately supported in terms of sensors, power management and features (OpenCL/RTX).

          NVIDIA drivers while being closed offer pretty much full support (except for the features which NVIDIA thinks aren't that sought after in Linux like AI for content creators/streamers and video encoding). And it doesn't help that Linux lacks proper APIs for that which were standardized in Windows many years ago.

          Lastly HWiNFO could very well be ported to Linux except:

          1) It needs a kernel driver and the Linux kernel lacks stable APIs and insists on including all drivers in the tree or you're basically screwed.
          2) Linux doesn't have any alternative to Win32 API. We've had GTK (1/2/3/4) and Qt (1/2/3/4/5/6) none of which offer any long term compatibility. Yeah, we've got flatpak/snap/appimage except on Windows it's a several megabytes binary which is blazingly fast and then at some point those light virtualization containers will update their base images and you'll still need to tackle compatibility issues.

          If I were a HWiNFO developer I wouldn't touch Linux with a ten foot pole. There's no way HWiNFO will ever be released as Open Source. It's rife with the data released under NDA.
          Last edited by birdie; 02 August 2021, 07:33 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by birdie View Post
            There's no way HWiNFO will ever be released as Open Source. It's rife with the data released under NDA.
            You can't blame Linux for that.

            1) It needs a kernel driver and the Linux kernel lacks stable APIs and insists on including all drivers in the tree or you're basically screwed.
            2) Linux doesn't have any alternative to Win32 API. We've had GTK (1/2/3/4) and Qt (1/2/3/4/5/6) none of which offer any long term compatibility.
            Linux is an ecosystem built on free software and collaboration. It plays by different rules. You are not supposed to judge it by standards of closed-source proprietary ecosystems.
            Last edited by intelfx; 02 August 2021, 08:29 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by birdie View Post
              2) Linux doesn't have any alternative to Win32 API. We've had GTK (1/2/3/4) and Qt (1/2/3/4/5/6) none of which offer any long term compatibility. Yeah, we've got flatpak/snap/appimage except on Windows it's a several megabytes binary which is blazingly fast and then at some point those light virtualization containers will update their base images and you'll still need to tackle compatibility issues.
              Hmm... spot the one who has never done development work. Actually software between versions of Windows breaks a lot. I know - I've occasionally been tasked with investigating problems with upcoming versions of Windows. The incompatibilities are never massive, but there is always stuff to fix.

              The only reason non technical people think that Windows is hugely compatible is because by the time they get the shrink-wrapped product, we've had time to fix everything up using beta versions of Windows. If Linux had a 6 month long Beta like Windows 11 is having at the moment, you wouldn't see problems there either.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by intelfx View Post

                You can't blame Linux for that.



                Linux is an ecosystem built on free software and collaboration. It plays by different rules. You are not supposed to judge it by standards of closed-source proprietary ecosystems.
                There's nothing preventing Linux from being friendly to closed source software. By being hostile, Linux alienates a ton of software developers and ... users who seek this closed source software and cannot get it. Closed source software isn't going anywhere any time soon.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post

                  Hmm... spot the one who has never done development work. Actually software between versions of Windows breaks a lot. I know - I've occasionally been tasked with investigating problems with upcoming versions of Windows. The incompatibilities are never massive, but there is always stuff to fix.

                  The only reason non technical people think that Windows is hugely compatible is because by the time they get the shrink-wrapped product, we've had time to fix everything up using beta versions of Windows. If Linux had a 6 month long Beta like Windows 11 is having at the moment, you wouldn't see problems there either.
                  It breaks, right, but absolute most applications from the Windows 95 era work in Windows 11, 26 years later. There are no reasons or obstacles for Linux not to be in the same league. For instance applications linked to glibc alone may work for ages but this library alone is not enough for absolute most applications out there and certainly not for GUI applications.
                  Last edited by birdie; 03 August 2021, 10:55 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by birdie View Post
                    Under Linux I get this:
                    Try using zenpower, it needs to be built via DKMS but it's better than having nearly no info at all.

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