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Linux Looks To Finally Remove Its Legacy IDE Driver Support

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  • AdamOne
    replied
    No! No! Oh, hell, noooooo!!

    Leave a comment:


  • uxmkt
    replied
    Originally posted by cynyr View Post
    I get frustrated using an SATA HDD [...] I can't imagine how annoying it would be speed wise using an IDE HDD in this day and age.
    It makes no difference [... just grab a SATA SSD anyway]
    care to show me a reasonable cost 8TB Sata SSD? a WD red and Seagate Ironwolf are about $200USD right now on newegg. If there is a 8TB SSD on the market for less than $400 with similar duty ratings (soho nas) i'll eat my hat.
    Ah. My comment was not attempting to suggest SSDs for movie archives. The lowest SATA is rated for up to 150MB/s, the highest IDE HDD UDMA is rated for up to 133 MB/s. It's 11%, but it's not that bad. Though, I can't imagine anyone having masses of data on IDE in this day and age, and such machines probably only exist for historic reasons, and only see an occassional boot or so -- and that is a pattern dominated by random I/O, and random IO on sucks equally on rotational media.

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  • cynyr
    replied
    Originally posted by uxmkt View Post
    It makes no difference. The big impact of (rotating) HDDs is the latency, which you will experience with both SATA and IDE likewise.
    If you have old machinery, why not grab a direct-plug SATA-IDE bridge so you can attach SATA-SSDs to an onboard IDE pinout.
    care to show me a reasonable cost 8TB Sata SSD? a WD red and Seagate Ironwolf are about $200USD right now on newegg. If there is a 8TB SSD on the market for less than $400 with similar duty ratings (soho nas) i'll eat my hat.

    Leave a comment:


  • cynyr
    replied
    Originally posted by Adarion View Post

    Well, this is what people usually tend to say. "Yeah, come on, just use some old SW for your old HW". That will work at the moment, but you'll then never be able to participate from new kernel infrastructure, newly added drivers or other improvements that could be relevant for your HW, bug and security fixes and so on. So this is quite a mixed bag.
    (However, I also understand that not all kernel devs do have time and HW access to test the big bunch of HW that is supported by the kernel.)
    well it looks like Kernel 5.4 will be supported until the end of 2025. https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html These should receive security related backports, and fixes to other serious bugs, but no new features. So yes, it's unlikely you'll be able to use that AMD7900XT GPU in your M68K based machine in the future. I mean that's assuming that you have any modern hardware that can be plugged into a M68K machine in the first place.

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  • uxmkt
    replied
    Originally posted by PublicNuisance View Post
    I get frustrated using an SATA HDD instead of an SSD so I can't imagine how annoying it would be speed wise using an IDE HDD in this day and age.
    It makes no difference. The big impact of (rotating) HDDs is the latency, which you will experience with both SATA and IDE likewise.
    If you have old machinery, why not grab a direct-plug SATA-IDE bridge so you can attach SATA-SSDs to an onboard IDE pinout.

    Leave a comment:


  • camel_case
    replied
    Originally posted by ix900 View Post

    Don't know. Seen some rather important businesses using old SW with old HW.

    I definitely don't understand people who want to use eg 20 year old hardware and have the latest SW. Just buy new HW lol. Its 20 years old. That's a whole different world. I have a 20+ year old computer sitting here and do not attempt to put stuff from today on it. 10 years I will simply because its 4 core, etc and many computers are still sold with less performance but there's a point where it doesn't make sense.
    Often its not about the HW itself you want to use, it is a bigger System where the HW is only a single part you cant change. If you speak about production machines, medical devices or even simple stuff like billing machines you no more say "just buy new, lol".

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  • PublicNuisance
    replied
    I get frustrated using an SATA HDD instead of an SSD so I can't imagine how annoying it would be speed wise using an IDE HDD in this day and age.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by Adarion View Post
    Well, this is what people usually tend to say. "Yeah, come on, just use some old SW for your old HW". That will work at the moment, but you'll then never be able to participate from new kernel infrastructure, newly added drivers or other improvements that could be relevant for your HW, bug and security fixes and so on. So this is quite a mixed bag.
    (However, I also understand that not all kernel devs do have time and HW access to test the big bunch of HW that is supported by the kernel.)
    How often do you find yourself using such an old system and connecting something new to it? This is assuming the device is even physically compatible.
    How often do the bug and security fixes actually affect older hardware in any relevant way at all?

    The way I see it, if you're using a platform old enough to warrant the legacy IDE driver, every time you get a kernel update, you're just slowly taking up space with nothing to gain. Space that ironically, those old IDE drives likely don't have much of.
    I'm sure you could run the 3.xx kernel and be largely unaffected.


    Much of the reason for using legacy hardware is for legacy software.

    Leave a comment:


  • muncrief
    replied
    Well, I know there are still quite a few machines out there using IDE drives, at least in schools, especially underfunded pre-schools, etc. In fact I've built quite a few systems over the decades for those who can't afford new computers by cobbling together whatever I have in various drawers and other storage areas, as it's still a viable way to provide computers for free. However I have to say it's been over a year since I built the last one, as most kids demand tablets and/or laptops now.

    So I guess so long as libata will get people by for another few years this is probably the best way to handle it. The kind of potpourri desktops I'm describing are going to suffer various terminal failures as more time goes by, and I imagine most will be gone in another five years or so.

    It is kind of sad to see another era end though.

    Leave a comment:


  • NateHubbard
    replied
    Originally posted by ix900 View Post
    I definitely don't understand people who want to use eg 20 year old hardware and have the latest SW. Just buy new HW lol.
    Or just buy cheap used hardware that is old, but not ancient.

    Leave a comment:

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