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Coreboot 4.12 Released - Drops Older Intel / AMD Platforms

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  • Coreboot 4.12 Released - Drops Older Intel / AMD Platforms

    Phoronix: Coreboot 4.12 Released - Drops Older Intel / AMD Platforms

    Coreboot 4.12 is out today as the latest version of this open-source BIOS / system firmware implementation that saw more than 2,600 commits since the previous release...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-4.12-Released

  • #2
    It's very sad to see more and more boards and systems / CPUs / chipsets dropped from Coreboot's active support.
    It is okay if enterprises support FOSS development, but IMO Google's influence here becomes unhealthy. All the additions seem to be more and more Chrombook focused and there is not time for anything else. That sucks. Besides, this older HW might sometimes even be better supported.
    But then, it would also be about time for all those CPU and mainboard vendors to support Coreboot development (again).
    Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

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    • #3
      Updated my Asus board, works good

      Code:
      # dmidecode 3.2
      Getting SMBIOS data from sysfs.
      SMBIOS 2.8 present.
      14 structures occupying 643 bytes.
      Table at 0x7FF4B020.
      
      Handle 0x0000, DMI type 0, 26 bytes
      BIOS Information
             Vendor: coreboot
             Version: 4.12-2-gd82c7d24ff-dirty
             Release Date: 05/12/2020
             ROM Size: 8192 kB
             Characteristics:
                     PCI is supported
                     PC Card (PCMCIA) is supported
                     BIOS is upgradeable
                     Selectable boot is supported
                     ACPI is supported
                     Targeted content distribution is supported
             BIOS Revision: 4.12
             Firmware Revision: 0.0
      
      Handle 0x0001, DMI type 1, 27 bytes
      System Information
             Manufacturer: ASUS
             Product Name: P8H61-M PRO
             Version: 1.0
             Serial Number: Scratchi67
             UUID: Not Settable
             Wake-up Type: Reserved
             SKU Number: Not Specified
             Family: Not Specified

      Comment


      • #4
        Coreboot on x86 is like putting lipstick on a pig. We need a true open platform.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Adarion View Post
          It's very sad to see more and more boards and systems / CPUs / chipsets dropped from Coreboot's active support.
          It is okay if enterprises support FOSS development, but IMO Google's influence here becomes unhealthy.
          The removal of FSP 1.0 and Agesa code wasn't driven by Google but by community members (mostly two: one affiliated to a smaller corporate coreboot developer/user, the other one with no corporate affiliation) who were unhappy about having to work around less than stellar chipset code that nobody cared enough to clean up. SInce they had a pretty good argument on their side, and because nobody stepped up and provided a fix for the older chipsets, they were dropped. We'd accept patches that bring them back, but it's unlikely to happen given that this task won't become easier with every month that the codebase diverges from the point where these chipsets were dropped, and nobody did it when it was still "easy" (i.e. when the code was still in the tree).

          Originally posted by Adarion View Post
          All the additions seem to be more and more Chrombook focused and there is not time for anything else. That sucks. Besides, this older HW might sometimes even be better supported.
          How is the increase of work on Chromebooks taking away time from anything else? One feature of 4.12 is out-of-the-box measured boot support which apparently will end up in https://github.com/osresearch/heads. That measured boot stuff is an extension of the Chrome OS initiated verified boot library, code contributed by developers not affiliated to Chrome OS, and not used by Chrome OS.

          Originally posted by Adarion View Post
          But then, it would also be about time for all those CPU and mainboard vendors to support Coreboot development (again).
          Besides some _ancient_ Tyan boards (around 2005 or so?) which were already only semi-official if I remember correctly (I think the terms were along the lines of "we don't mind what internal datasheets you read in your spare time, but that project is not affiliated with us"), I think the first mainboard vendor that the general IT public may have heard of (there were a few specialist shops shipping coreboot more than 10 years ago) to really support coreboot was Google with the first Chromebooks that ran coreboot.

          The AMD support for AGESA was certainly nicer than what we have today by CPU vendors in that they scrubbed internal code for a fully open source release, but there are probably more engineers from CPU vendors involved in coreboot development today than AMD had firmware engineers in total back then. So all in all, a mixed bag. Fully open source firmware definitely remains the goal, but that part of the computing space sadly isn't very conductive to it, and hardware is only getting more complex, so achieving that goal remains an uphill struggle.

          (Full Disclosure: I work on coreboot as part of the Chrome OS firmware team, although not when the decision for coreboot was made or even with the first few generations of Chromebooks. I worked on coreboot in other companies before that. I also managed a few coreboot releases, including the just-announced 4.12.)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by angrypie View Post
            Coreboot on x86 is like putting lipstick on a pig. We need a true open platform.
            Agreed -- that's why we invested so heavily in OpenPOWER. Fully open firmware from the factory, no mysterious ME/PSP type management binaries, and an open ISA too. You might want to take a look at the Blackbird for a (relatively) low cost entry point...I use one as my daily driver, quite happy with it overall!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by madscientist159 View Post
              You might want to take a look at the Blackbird for a (relatively) low cost entry point...I use one as my daily driver, quite happy with it overall!
              I looked at it last year and wasn't happy with the available distros or the available graphics card drivers at the time. Can you tell us which distro you are using and which graphic card? Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                I just installed it on an old chromebook (Lenovo X131e) so I could put linux on it. Didn't realize that was 'old'.

                Comment


                • #9
                  When are they to offer support for AM4 ?
                  With current Zen3 support snag ( dropped from existing AM4 boards due to BIOS chip size ), Core/Libre/boot would make a killing...
                  And that's before considering newest crop of security issues everywhere...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Brane215 View Post
                    With current Zen3 support snag ( dropped from existing AM4 boards due to BIOS chip size ), Core/Libre/boot would make a killing...
                    That's a bullshit excuse and AMD knows it. Whoever is in charge of their PR needs to get fired.

                    Anyway, I don't think you can work around AGESA/PSP on anything post-AM3+, and pestering AMD to open up AGESA again might not work.
                    Last edited by tildearrow; 05-15-2020, 12:49 PM.

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