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Raspberry Pi 4 Thermal Performance Is Improving With New Firmware

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  • #21
    Originally posted by discordian View Post
    Some convincing needs would be mapping large files (need the addresspace, not the physical RAM), docker only support 64bit Arm and several developer tools like valgrind or sanitizers not or barely working without 64bit.
    What made you get that idea?
    Code:
    $ pacman -Si docker | grep ^Arch
    Architecture    : armv7h
    Also, on Docker Hub many official images (ex. gcc) show with support for both "ARM" and "ARM 64", so it's not just community supported.

    Why do you say valgrind is "barely working"? I used it a couple of weeks ago to find some bugs and it was working perfectly fine for me. Maybe for programs using a lot of RAM there will be issues, but physical RAM limits will be hit first.

    Which sanitizers don't support 32-bit ARM? The memory tagging stuff was only added in Armv8.5-A, of which no consumer (i.e. not server) devices I'm aware of currently support, so that's not an advantage for current 64-bit ARM.

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    • #22
      I would want ARMv8, it is modern and clean. I would not want the old legacy ARMv7.

      Can you run ARMv8 on Raspberry Pi 4? Else it is not a much appealing SoC.
      Do most people run their Raspberry Pi 4 as ARMv7?

      Hey everyone, are you happy with your Raspberry Pi 4?
      What are you happy about?
      Anything that you miss from it? or could be better?

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by Caffarius View Post

        Just upgraded packages on my Pi 3's Arch Linux Arm install. Their aarch64 kernel is at 5.4.1 today. I can't say it feels any snappier but I'm bottlenecked by the SD card.

        A little ironic considering Arch Linux (x64) still has 5.4.1 in testing.
        Even more ironic was a statement from the RPi devs in the same forums saying how they could *barely* get anything running under the 5.3 kernel and yet, as you say, Arch is having success with the 5.4 series. Surely Arch doesn't have the $$$ backing like RPi Foundation does and yet they have a working-ish 64-bit distro for Pi3? How does that happen. Always felt that Broadcom has never been all that great a player with respect to Linux. Considering how popular Pi's are you'd think they'd be tripping over themselves to update their closed source drivers to work better (and thus move more product in that market segment). Something about planned obsolescence though, right? Pity.

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        • #24
          Michael, there should be even more important thermal improvement in kernel 4.19.83 and newer. You can install the new kernel and firmware simply using:
          Code:
          sudo rpi-update
          Also check the USB firmware with:
          Code:
          sudo rpi-eeprom-update

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          • #25
            Originally posted by betam4x View Post
            They should segment the Pi into 3 separate product lines: High Performance, Standard (current raspberry pi), and Ultra Low Power (pi zero). The high performance model could include a significantly faster SOC that requires active cooling, a new (standardized) form factor large enough for an NVME m.2 drive, yet still small and compact (they could do away with the headphone jack, since HDMI already includes audio) and replace the micro-usb jack with USB type C for charging). I would pay up to $100 personally for that type of device. The standard model would be the current Pi. The ultra low power would be the Pi Zero.
            The Pi 4 uses type C, and has much more powerful hardware (4x Cortex-A72 rather than the old 4x Cortex A53). Also, it architecturally supports PCIe, but is used for the on-board USB 3 chip. It also has different options based on how much RAM you want (1GB for $35, 2GB for $45, and 4GB for $45). If you haven't checked out the Pi 4 yet, you really should, it's quite nice.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              Can you run ARMv8 on Raspberry Pi 4? Else it is not a much appealing SoC.
              Do most people run their Raspberry Pi 4 as ARMv7?
              I believe the processor on RPi4 could run ARMv8, but the current kernel provided in Raspbian boots it as ARMv7 instead. And then I think the entire software repo is compiled to ARMv6, for maintaining backwards compatibility with the older Raspberry Pi's.

              All of my Android devices currently run ARMv7 and one of my reasons for buying a Raspberry Pi was to try to make it easier on me for porting code to my Android devices. Cross-compiling from x86 is always hit-or-miss as to whether you can get it to work or not, but self hosted compiling often helps make it a lot easier to get stuff working. While I haven't actually used my RPi4 for this yet, the potential is there.

              Hey everyone, are you happy with your Raspberry Pi 4?
              What are you happy about?
              Anything that you miss from it? or could be better?
              I'm really happy about how cool and power efficient my Raspberry Pi 4 runs, and I love that it runs real Linux instead of that super locked down, yet still insecure from crackers, Android. Playing Warzone 2100 on my x86 laptop causes my machine to heat up and eventually spontaneously reboot -- no such problem playing Warzone 2100 for hours on my Raspberry Pi 4. I don't even have a heatsink, just an old CPU fan blowing gently across the board.

              Video is the only thing that gives me a slight reason to want to continue using my x86 from time to time. WEBM video files downloaded from youtube don't seem to play correctly except in Chromium. Even there it seems right on the edge of not working... MP4 files seem to play pretty good in all the usual apps, but there is some slight screen tearing when watching videos inside a window instead of watching them at full screen. When switching to full screen mode or back, there seems to be an intermittent bug that sometimes causes playback to visually crash (at least it doesn't crash the whole OS or mess up other apps). 3D apps like Warzone 2100 or my own OpenGL ES video game sometimes have visual errors compared to running on x86, although nothing serious enough to prevent playability. Clearly, video is the one area that I hope the devs continue working on improving.

              Hardware wise, I wish there was an option for 16GB of RAM. I miss having so much RAM at my disposal on the x86... 4GB is livable for now though. Other than that, this hardware is really pretty damned good. Dual full sized desktop monitors is great for coding on.

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