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ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO Testing On Ubuntu 18.04 Linux

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  • ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO Testing On Ubuntu 18.04 Linux

    Phoronix: ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO Testing On Ubuntu 18.04 Linux

    For those in the market for an AMD X570 high-end motherboard for use with the new Zen 2 processors, the ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO was one of the boards sent out as part of the reviewer's kit and it's been working out quite well...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...HAIR-VIII-HERO

  • #2
    Originally posted by Michael
    The ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII HERO is quite feature packed with ... active chipset heatsink
    Tiny, whiny fans are a bug; not a feature!
    I can't believe a board that costs so much wouldn't use a heatpipe like higher-end boards did in the days of nForce 4/5 chipsets. They could have at least used a bigger (and thus, slower/quieter) fan. A 40mm fan is going to easily be the noisiest thing in most systems, especially in these days of better stock heatsinks and silent SSD's.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by DanL View Post
      A 40mm fan is going to easily be the noisiest thing in most systems, especially in these days of better stock heatsinks and silent SSD's.
      It's not spinning at any appreciable speed. It's there to cool 15w, not 100w.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DanL View Post
        Tiny, whiny fans are a bug; not a feature!
        I can't believe a board that costs so much wouldn't use a heatpipe like higher-end boards did in the days of nForce 4/5 chipsets. They could have at least used a bigger (and thus, slower/quieter) fan. A 40mm fan is going to easily be the noisiest thing in most systems, especially in these days of better stock heatsinks and silent SSD's.
        The loudest components are often the GPUs (coil whine), HDDs and fans, but you can't get away with having no fans unless you have massive coolers.

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        • #5
          Any chance of an actual (Linux-focussed) X570 mainboard review? Not benchmarks (as long as something isn't broken, they all should be in the same ballpark), not features (see manufacturer's website), but general usability. Things like: Is the fan control (including chipset fan) provided by the UEFI first class? Does hardware monitoring work? What do the IOMMU groups look like?

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          • #6
            I was long time asus mb supporter in our company but after few dead x99 based motherboards im stuck to supermicro and didn't regret. Too much fancy features on asus's mbs which are potential point of failure. Esspesialy OC shits.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              It's not spinning at any appreciable speed. It's there to cool 15w, not 100w.
              How do you know what speed it spins at? 40mm fans need to spin at a relatively high speed to move any "appreciable" air. A 10-15W chipset is harder to cool (quietly) than you think. I got a large heatsink to passively cool an nForce4 UItra board, but it ended up being blazing hot and I had to aim a 120mm fan at it to keep temps in check.

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              • #8
                Yeah I am definitely not a huge fan of these power hungry chipsets. As far as I understand, this additional complexity is for supporting PCI-E 4.0. If that is the case, I wonder how the Talos II mainboard compares, since it also supports the latest PCI-E revision.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DanL View Post
                  Tiny, whiny fans are a bug; not a feature!
                  I can't believe a board that costs so much wouldn't use a heatpipe like higher-end boards did in the days of nForce 4/5 chipsets. They could have at least used a bigger (and thus, slower/quieter) fan. A 40mm fan is going to easily be the noisiest thing in most systems, especially in these days of better stock heatsinks and silent SSD's.
                  There is one X570 MB which uses a heat-pipe instead of a fan. IIRC it was one of Gigabyte's models. The heat-pipe leads to the VRM heat-sink, which was a proper heat-sink and not just one of these "mostly-just-for-looks" aluminium blocks without fins.

                  I too pretty much despise this aesthetics before function trend that has been going on lately. I wish there was more consumer class hardware with the features that I needed that didn't have all the stupid RGB-bling and stuff.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DanL View Post

                    How do you know what speed it spins at? 40mm fans need to spin at a relatively high speed to move any "appreciable" air. A 10-15W chipset is harder to cool (quietly) than you think. I got a large heatsink to passively cool an nForce4 UItra board, but it ended up being blazing hot and I had to aim a 120mm fan at it to keep temps in check.
                    The power consumption is so low that you could run it fan-less, as at last one manufacturer did (Gigabyte?). This guy ended his video asking why they did bother including a fan at all:

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