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SolidRun ClearFog: A 16-Core ARM ITX Workstation Board Aiming For $500~750 USD

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  • SolidRun ClearFog: A 16-Core ARM ITX Workstation Board Aiming For $500~750 USD

    Phoronix: SolidRun ClearFog: A 16-Core ARM ITX Workstation Board Aiming For $500~750 USD

    Edge computing solutions vendor SolidRun is working on "ClearFog" as an ITX-based ARM64 workstation platform. They hope for an early bird launch price later this year of around $500~500 USD for this board that has 16 ARMv8 cores, multiple 10 GbE SFP+ connections, Gigabit Ethernet, multiple USB 3.0 and 2.0 ports, 2 x mPCIe, four SATA ports, and can handle up to 64GB of laptop DDR4 memory...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...n-ClearFog-ITX

  • #2
    You have leave some room for easy improvement for 2nd gen/revision

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    • #3
      Originally posted by andrei_me View Post
      You have leave some room for easy improvement for 2nd gen/revision
      I was thinking the same thing. Plus, this board is good enough for distributions and early adopters to get software up and running and the next one would be the product consumers would want to use.

      Comment


      • #4
        Does this include RAM in the price? If it does, that's a pretty good deal.

        To me, the only things this board needs is a PCIe x8 slot (which should be enough for the vast majority of GPUs you'd likely run on this) and a way to mount other heatsinks (maybe to allow overclocking).

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        • #5
          Michael, You have 500~500, 500~550 and 500~750 in this article. At least one of them is wrong.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

            I was thinking the same thing. Plus, this board is good enough for distributions and early adopters to get software up and running and the next one would be the product consumers would want to use.
            It is a very new chip. We were impressed by the performance and are working with NXP to get it out to the development community as quickly as possible. End of they year the Rev B silicon will be released to us.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
              Does this include RAM in the price? If it does, that's a pretty good deal.

              To me, the only things this board needs is a PCIe x8 slot (which should be enough for the vast majority of GPUs you'd likely run on this) and a way to mount other heatsinks (maybe to allow overclocking).
              It has a x8 open slotted PCIe slot. We plan to support it as a full ARM workstation. The price is for barebones, so no RAM, but it supports standard DDR4 SO-DIMMS up to 64GB. It is Dual-Channel so they need to be installed in pairs.

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              • #8
                Very cool, it looks like they're launching it with an optional industrial enclosure, or a minitower pc case. It sounds silly, but a decent and sturdy enclosure makes it much easier to integrate into your typical software developer's office environment.

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                • #9
                  As for the product, by the time it comes to market, A76 will be almost 2 years old.
                  Except for smartphones, everywhere else ARM SoCs have a problem keeping up with latest uarch and manufacturing process.

                  A72 was announced early 2015. It is 4 years old already.

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                  • #10
                    I suppose these old cores have small hardware revisions i.e. bugfixes - all CPUs have a long list of bugs.
                    It must take more time to design these SoCs when you're not funded by giant phone companies with huge pressure for a yearly release cadence.
                    More tests and validation because if you ship a buggy server, you're toasted. Phones probably can paper over this with last minute firmware and kernel hacks.

                    Even Intel has been shipping CPU servers one generation behind for a long time, except this is not very visible lately due to stalling on Skylake and 14nm.

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