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ASRock Rack EPYCD8-2T Makes For A Great Linux/BSD EPYC Workstation - 7-Way OS AMD 7351P Benchmarks

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  • #21
    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
    ECC memory, mainly. AFAIK not officially supported on Ryzen or TR.
    ECC on TR is official. https://www.amd.com/en/products/ryzen-threadripper


    Quad-Channel DDR4 ECC Memory Support
    With the most memory channels you can get on desktop, the Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor can support Workstation Standard DDR4 ECC (Error Correcting Mode) Memory to keep you tight, tuned and perfectly in sync.


    And most TR boards I know do support ECC.
    Last edited by starshipeleven; 03-01-2019, 04:56 AM.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
      If that's true, it sounds like the X399 board ECC support has improved considerably. As the links I posted illustrate, ECC support on X399 boards was at one time, spotty and inconsistent, leading to plenty of consumer confusion. Whether through firmware updates, or just better vendor support, it sounds like over time the situation has improved.
      Consumer boards routinely ship with immature board firmware, this is normal. All board that do support ECC did advertise ECC support in their specs though.
      Last edited by starshipeleven; 03-01-2019, 04:56 AM.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by MrMorden View Post
        Looks like a good board, but where did you buy it? The availability of this part appears to be negligible.
        It was in stock at NewEgg at the time.
        Michael Larabel
        http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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        • #24
          Originally posted by pcxmac View Post
          if only that were AM4.... I have an old X99 that spews AER errors like a mad dog, can't wait till a consumer AMD processor can handle 7 slots at least PCIEx8 in length each
          Well, that's asking for quite a lot if you want something as cheap as a typical AM4 platform. You'll need to spend at least $800 on the CPU and motherboard alone. What exactly do you need so many slots with so many lanes for? That's typically server-grade stuff right there.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
            Why not get a Threadripper build and just underclock it?
            Some features are disabled / unsupported on Threadripper.
            • RDIMM/LR-DIMM/NVDIMM support
            • SME / SEV
            • dual socket capability


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            • #26
              It may look good on paper but ASRock? No thanks. Too many boards that promise a lot and end up either being not fully functional or buggy as hell. Then in short order stop making BIOS updates leaving the thing to rot. Many defunct motherboard manufacturers operated this way and they eventually folded because of it.

              My primary criteria when looking at board makers is to simply look at how long they continue to support the board with updates over time. Some manufacturers simply crank out a board then abandon it for the next one. These seem like poorly run companies and a recipe for disaster.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by pcxmac View Post
                if only that were AM4.... I have an old X99 that spews AER errors like a mad dog, can't wait till a consumer AMD processor can handle 7 slots at least PCIEx8 in length each
                If they are correctable errors then there's nothing to worry about. It's like worrying about WiFi transmission errors.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by linner View Post
                  It may look good on paper but ASRock? No thanks. Too many boards that promise a lot and end up either being not fully functional or buggy as hell. Then in short order stop making BIOS updates leaving the thing to rot. Many defunct motherboard manufacturers operated this way and they eventually folded because of it.

                  My primary criteria when looking at board makers is to simply look at how long they continue to support the board with updates over time. Some manufacturers simply crank out a board then abandon it for the next one. These seem like poorly run companies and a recipe for disaster.
                  I've no experience with ASrock, but I agree with your general sentiment. IMO this problem is more prevalent on the consumer peecee side than on the server boards. I went through several craptastic uber-buggy VIA chipset boards in the 90's and early 2000's.

                  My go-to board vendor these days is Supermicro, as they seem to make a solid product and will still release BIOS updates years later. I have a bunch of H8SCM Opteron boards from them, circa 2011, and they most recently shipped a new BIOS in 2016 - a full five years later.

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