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Coreboot Support Taking Shape For Intel Icelake

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  • Coreboot Support Taking Shape For Intel Icelake

    Phoronix: Coreboot Support Taking Shape For Intel Icelake

    Intel developers have been punctual in their bring-up of Icelake support within Coreboot...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...reboot-Bringup

  • #2
    I wish there were support for Icelake on Coreboot on other boards than Chromebooks. Like desktop PC boards.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      I wish there were support for Icelake on Coreboot on other boards than Chromebooks. Like desktop PC boards.
      I don't, the future of free hardware isn't x86 anyway. Either decent ARM boards or Power.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by phoronix View Post
        Icelake is the follow-on 10nm+ successor to Cannonlake and Whiskey/Amber/Coffee Lake hardware expected in 2019~2020.
        They have barely started to mass-produce Cannonlake at 10nm and they are already going to call this "10nm+"?
        The yields are probably still lower than when Broadwell at 14nm was released, so these "+" likely don't mean a thing anymore.

        Looking forward to when they start calling some process 10nm++ which could be interpreted as 11nm lol

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        • #5
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          I don't, the future of free hardware isn't x86 anyway. Either decent ARM boards or Power.
          Yeah, that would be nice too. I want a computer that is open.
          But POWER have existed for a long time, and it doesn't seem to be gaining any traction on the desktop or laptop side. It seems its only for servers, with the only desktop actor being Raptor Engineering.
          ARM may gain more traction with some Chromebooks adapting it, and perhaps Apple will abandon x86 in favor of ARM.
          But so far it doesn't seem anyone is pushing ARM for the desktop.

          But at least x86 is standardized with BIOS and UEFI. ARM is a mess with no standards and everything boots its own way.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            But at least x86 is standardized with BIOS and UEFI. ARM is a mess with no standards and everything boots its own way.
            ARM is standardizing on UEFI+ACPI for server and a basic UEFI subset of features + ACPI or Device Tree for embedded devices, in its own boot specification https://www.cnx-software.com/2018/08...edded-systems/

            This is of course only valid for devices where the OEM wants the device to be able to boot generic firmware images. Like for example Libre Computer's boards.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              ARM is standardizing on UEFI+ACPI for server and a basic UEFI subset of features + ACPI or Device Tree for embedded devices, in its own boot specification https://www.cnx-software.com/2018/08...edded-systems/

              This is of course only valid for devices where the OEM wants the device to be able to boot generic firmware images. Like for example Libre Computer's boards.
              We've heard for years about UEFI and ACPI on ARM. In the real world its all just a big mess.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                We've heard for years about UEFI and ACPI on ARM. In the real world its all just a big mess.
                You have heard for the server standard perhaps.

                The standard for the ARM embedded devices is a new thing.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                  You have heard for the server standard perhaps.

                  The standard for the ARM embedded devices is a new thing.
                  Hmm, yes I think you're right. I think I've heard it for server standard.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    I don't, the future of free hardware isn't x86 anyway. Either decent ARM boards or Power.
                    What about RISC-V ?

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