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Linux Receiving ACPI "Time and Alarm Device" Driver

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  • Linux Receiving ACPI "Time and Alarm Device" Driver

    Phoronix: Linux Receiving ACPI "Time and Alarm Device" Driver

    Another new driver coming for Linux 4.17 is a device driver implementing ACPI's specification for the Time and Alarm Device (TAD). On systems with a supported ACPI version, this can be a handy means of waking up a system with some trivial scripting...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...CPI-TAD-Driver

  • #2
    By the way, is there GUI app for setting wake up by RTC timer?

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    • #3
      I've been looking for this since ages. Time to buy a new mainboard with a 6.2+ ACPI compliant bios.

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      • #4
        I wonder if something related to this is why one of my systems automatically wakes up ~ 24 hours after it is suspended.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ihatemichael
          I use my computer as an alarm clock device (to wake me up) sometimes.
          i did that when i had no smartphone

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pal666 View Post
            i did that when i had no smartphone
            Stuff like this makes Linux viable in tablets and smart phones. It is incredibly convient to have a device in you pocket that can act as an alarm clock, a timer or even a stop watch on a moments notice. Having this facility built into yhe kernel should make for similar apps with a standard interface to the hardware.

            In otherwords we may be seeing a number if apps try to exploit this driver.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
              Stuff like this makes Linux viable in tablets and smart phones.
              linux was most used tablet and smartphone os long before this stuff. linux is just the best os, dominating in every market except destop, due to ms' monopoly abuse
              Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
              It is incredibly convient to have a device in you pocket that can act as an alarm clock, a timer or even a stop watch on a moments notice. Having this facility built into yhe kernel should make for similar apps with a standard interface to the hardware.

              In otherwords we may be seeing a number if apps try to exploit this driver.
              do you keep x86 devices in your pockets?

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              • #8
                None of you all is ever going to notice this new ACPI driver. None!
                Even if it's used, it will be by apps that that you might use (like pm-suspend), but you will never see "ACPI 6.2 TAD" or anything alike. For you it will just be a wakeup timer.

                If you have an RTC, which you all do for many many years, then you can already do wakeup timer. Literally for decades.

                This will not all of a sudden give you nice GUI timer interfaces. Not by far!

                This will not turn your pc into a alarm clock, you can already do that (again, for decades).

                So what is this then? I don't know.. ACPI 5.0 has a module with exactly the same name... I'm guessing it has to do with new power saving options to also support alarm timers from those to - in effect - save more power and have a longer battery life. But that's just guess work. This will change absolutely nothing for your system timers or alarms if you were already using that.

                The real missing piece here is a real user interface to set and use timers as seamlessly as you set an alarm on you phone. Linux is sadly very bad in this regard as there simply are no good modern "alarm applications". Sure, there is KAlarm and a bunch of others, but i wouldn't call that "good and modern".. It works, is ok, but that's about it.

                In fact, there isn't even a library out there (that i know of) dedicated to setting alarms and doing wakeups in a smart way. A smart way would be to have an "event pool" of events that need to happen and have the alarm set at the next upcoming event. That is how android does it. On top of that library you can then make a fancy alarm application.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                  Stuff like this makes Linux viable in tablets and smart phones.
                  ACPI is a (broken, shit) standard for passing hardware specifications/bindings to the kernel in x86 land, and usually relies on (broken, shit) UEFI board firmware (or on slightly less shit BIOS for older stuff).

                  Anything outside of that is using the devicetree system and 0 bullshit board firmwares in between, and that works fine since a long time already.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ihatemichael
                    I had the alarm clock in Android fail a number of times, I find that GNU/Linux is often more reliable than Android apps, so I tend to use both for reliability, the Android alarm clock and my PC (both at the same time).
                    but this is board firmware(acpi). imo it has much higher chance to fail than android
                    Originally posted by ihatemichael
                    I'm curious, but which method did you use when you were using your computer as an alarm clock?
                    sleep && mplayer

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