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  • Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ WiFi Performance

    Phoronix: Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ WiFi Performance

    Yesterday in our Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ benchmarks we looked at the faster Cortex-A53 CPU cores of this new $35 USD ARM SBC as well as its much faster Ethernet and better thermal management over earlier Raspberry Pi boards. The other area improved with the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ is the WiFi/WLAN wireless networking, which is what we have benchmarks of today.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26140

  • #2
    Wouldn't be surprised if WiFi is faster now than the wired connection.

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    • #3
      Up to 106 Mbps wifi and 150/150M full duplex ethernet. Pretty solid high perf computing.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by entropy View Post
        Wouldn't be surprised if WiFi is faster now than the wired connection.
        I did some looking and the SDIO bus that the wifi sits on in both the 3 and 3+ is 50MHz by 4 bits, so 25MB/s is the maximum amount of data that can pass the bus. Given that some of that is going to be housekeeping and protocol overhead, I'd say that the wifi can't do any more than 200Mb/s while we've seen that the GigE via USB 2.0 can do 300+ (at least in one direction). The SDIO bus isn't bidirectional, so it's not 25MB/s each way, it's total bandwidth is 25MB/s.

        I only mention that because the Rpi seems able to do 300Mb/s over it's USB2.0 GigE while native GigE implementations can do 1000Mb/s *each way* simultaniously. (okay, it's less than that for various reasons, but that's the ballpark) For a total fo 2000Mb/s aggregate. So, keep that in mind when comparing the simplex interfaces like USB, SDIO, and Wifi with bidirectional ones like PCI-E and Ethernet.

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        • #5
          i have one since a year ago, I still can't find something that this thing can be useful for- i have an atom board with windows and hdmi that can do everything i want it to, so i just cannot find the niche for this thing.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sireangelus View Post
            i have one since a year ago, I still can't find something that this thing can be useful for- i have an atom board with windows and hdmi that can do everything i want it to, so i just cannot find the niche for this thing.
            It makes a nice little PEN tester with Kali Linux on it. I know what you mean however. I have Intel SOC mini boards that run Windows and can do many things, albeit slowly.

            People's perception of what Pi's "should" do sometimes outstrips what it really "can" do. For $35, one has to keep their concept of what the Pi can do relative to its abilities. I admit I spend time on the net and bookstores looking at what other people do with their Pi's.

            The most creative use of Pi's usually comes from those Raspberry Jam groups, where 9-13 year old's show off some really cool concepts in how to use a Pi and their cases. The biggest use seems to be around robotics and automation at the moment. Drone control were big for awhile and seem to be tapering off as mass produced drones pick up the market.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by willmore View Post

              I did some looking and the SDIO bus that the wifi sits on in both the 3 and 3+ is 50MHz by 4 bits, so 25MB/s is the maximum amount of data that can pass the bus. Given that some of that is going to be housekeeping and protocol overhead, I'd say that the wifi can't do any more than 200Mb/s while we've seen that the GigE via USB 2.0 can do 300+ (at least in one direction). The SDIO bus isn't bidirectional, so it's not 25MB/s each way, it's total bandwidth is 25MB/s.
              Is the sdio shared with the SD card ? Or would RPI make a perfect WiFi NAS with a 512 GB SD card?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
                The most creative use of Pi's usually comes from those Raspberry Jam groups, where 9-13 year old's show off some really cool concepts in how to use a Pi and their cases. The biggest use seems to be around robotics and automation at the moment. Drone control were big for awhile and seem to be tapering off as mass produced drones pick up the market.
                It's really great that RPI can turn people into developers. The other board communities produce ARM kernel/GPU/uboot hackers who will basically become unemployed due to the lack of useful skills.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sireangelus View Post
                  i have one since a year ago, I still can't find something that this thing can be useful for- i have an atom board with windows and hdmi that can do everything i want it to, so i just cannot find the niche for this thing.
                  You could use it to run as a DNS server. Manually or using something like pi-hole. That would give you "free" (as in not using your main computers ressources) DNSSec and blocking all ad servers.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by caligula View Post
                    Is the sdio shared with the SD card ? Or would RPI make a perfect WiFi NAS with a 512 GB SD card?
                    They are separate interfaces. As to making a 'perfect'WiFi NAS? I wouldn't say 'perfect'. It would make an okay one though it would use quite a bit more power than other solutions might.

                    Are you forgetting to add the sarcasm tag by any chance?

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