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AMD Developers Begin Making Open-Source FreeSync/AdaptiveSync Plans

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  • AMD Developers Begin Making Open-Source FreeSync/AdaptiveSync Plans

    Phoronix: AMD Developers Begin Making Open-Source FreeSync/AdaptiveSync Plans

    While the AMDGPU DC code is expected to land for Linux 4.15 with goodies like Vega display support, HDMI/DP audio, and atomic mode-setting, one of the sought after display features won't be initially supported: FreeSync or the VESA-backed AdaptiveSync...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...eSync-Planning

  • Wilfred
    replied
    Do the linux drivers also suffer from the power spikes the windows drivers have for vega64?

    Leave a comment:


  • juno
    replied
    Originally posted by Brisse View Post
    I kind of understand why they went with 35-90hz since this model came out before AMD introduced LFC in their driver, but now that LFC is a thing, it definitely runs better at 120 or 144hz. Also, BluRay's @ 23.976fps doesn't sync well at 90hz but will sync perfectly at 120/144hz.
    Yeah, might be the reason. However, IIRC other screen manufacturers had an option in the OSD to switch between a lower (min to medium refresh rate) and a higher (medim to max) FreeSync range, which I thought was a nice feature. It's still fine, though, because I prefer playing in higher rates anyway and I'm able to adjust the EDID.

    For BluRays FreeSync might also be interesting. Using Windows, mpv already works with FreeSync.

    BTW: While I don't play under Linux, I use a custom EDID there too. Simple reason: default mode in the EDID is 60 Hz and many Wayland compositors don't allow switching modes yet, so I have an EDID with the 144 Hz mode.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brisse
    replied
    Originally posted by juno View Post

    Yep, I've always been running mine at 56-144
    I kind of understand why they went with 35-90hz since this model came out before AMD introduced LFC in their driver, but now that LFC is a thing, it definitely runs better at 120 or 144hz. Also, BluRay's @ 23.976fps doesn't sync well at 90hz but will sync perfectly at 120/144hz.

    Leave a comment:


  • juno
    replied
    Originally posted by Brisse View Post

    Freesync/Adaptive Sync monitors define their dynamic refresh rate range in the EDID. It's then up to the graphics driver to respect these limitations.

    Funny thing is that the range can be modified in the EDID and as long as you put in reasonable numbers it might work. For example, my MG279Q officially supports Freesync between 35-90hz, but I prefer to run it at 44-120hz. 57-144hz will also work. LFC takes care of the lower limit and duplicate frames up to three times, so the actual range if running 44-120hz is 44/3 = 14.7 - 120fps.
    Yep, I've always been running mine at 56-144

    Leave a comment:


  • mibo
    replied
    Thank you Brisse and gbil.

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    Originally posted by leipero View Post
    but IPS screens have their own problems (latency)
    This has been solved now. Low latency IPS panels are now available. (They're more expensive though, at least as of 2017.)

    Leave a comment:


  • gbil
    replied
    Originally posted by Brisse View Post

    No, I've done it on Windows using CRU. I hope something similar will be possible on GNU/Linux once Freesync gets properly implemented.
    You can create a custom EDID file, the issue is that AMDGPU driver doesn't support the custom edid option in xorg configuration.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brisse
    replied
    Originally posted by mibo View Post

    Do you modify this in Linux?
    I read about an tool CRU for Windows but don't know if such thing exists for Linux.
    No, I've done it on Windows using CRU. I hope something similar will be possible on GNU/Linux once Freesync gets properly implemented.

    Leave a comment:


  • mibo
    replied
    Originally posted by Brisse View Post

    Freesync/Adaptive Sync monitors define their dynamic refresh rate range in the EDID. It's then up to the graphics driver to respect these limitations.

    Funny thing is that the range can be modified in the EDID and as long as you put in reasonable numbers it might work. For example, my MG279Q officially supports Freesync between 35-90hz, but I prefer to run it at 44-120hz. 57-144hz will also work. LFC takes care of the lower limit and duplicate frames up to three times, so the actual range if running 44-120hz is 44/3 = 14.7 - 120fps.
    Do you modify this in Linux?
    I read about an tool CRU for Windows but don't know if such thing exists for Linux.

    Leave a comment:

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