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AMD Developers Begin Making Open-Source FreeSync/AdaptiveSync Plans

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  • #51
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
    Do you have low IQ or something because proper support includes freesync, and the article says it is coming later, and gives no timeframe. So by the looks of it, vega2 will be out about same time as freesync support.
    You do realize that by your standard nothing has "proper support" on Linux? You should probably call it "full support" or something that fits your definitions better.
    "Why should I want to make anything up? Life's bad enough as it is without wanting to invent any more of it."

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    • #52
      Originally posted by microcode View Post

      Correct me if I'm wrong, but shouldn't the default video output mode of mpv be perfectly sufficient? I'm pretty sure it presents/draws frames at the video framerate no matter what, I notice it when I resize an MPV window playing 24p content. GIve MPV a try maybe, it'd be nice to see even if it's only on Windows for now.
      MPV has been my main video player since I ditched Windows early 2017.

      24fps content, which in reality is 23.976fps is impossible to sync correctly on a 60hz fixed refresh rate display because 60 / 23.976 = 2,502502503

      It will sync perfectly if your monitor refresh rate is one of the following:
      23,976 * 2 = 47,952hz
      23,976 * 3 = 71,928hz
      23,976 * 4 = 95,904hz
      23,976 * 5 = 119,88hz
      etc...

      Good news is that a 120hz monitor typically runs at 119.88hz which provides an overall good experience with most common video framerates. 60hz (typically 59.94hz) displays has to rely on 3:2 pull-down and other tricks which causes stuttering.

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      • #53
        Originally posted by darkbasic View Post

        Are you 100% sure it's just Adaptive Sync + certification? That's what I first thought but information is very scarse and I've never been able to get someone from AMD to confirm it.
        Will be possible to create an (uncertified of course) monitor 100% compatible with the Freesync 2 specs without any kind of IP?
        That's how I understand it if you don't count all the non synchronisation related features they added in Freesync 2 spec such as HDR. Not sure why they had to mix all that stuff into a specification which first was only related to synchronization. I think that causes a lot of confusion.

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        • #54
          Originally posted by L_A_G View Post

          You do realize that by your standard nothing has "proper support" on Linux? You should probably call it "full support" or something that fits your definitions better.
          No, i don't. Nvidia has supported gsync for ages and i don't know of any essential feature like that that they have not supported on Linux but do on windows.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by TheLexMachine View Post
            Notebook and AIO products require special display panels, certified and approved by Nvidia. 99.9999% of the notebook panels don't meet the requirements.
            Sure

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            • #56
              Originally posted by Brisse View Post
              It's a hardware feature of the monitor and display interface. With modern Nvidia cards, the hardware is there.
              what makes you think nvidia cards have hardware for adaptive sync?

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              • #57
                Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                This is why I had to switch to Nvidia. I waited for over a year for the AMD driver debacle to be over, but I could see it would be years more before it was. It's really a shame, I liked AMD.
                it is a shame that you switched from amd opensource "debacle" to nvidia opensource "fuck you"

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
                  Nvidia has supported gsync for ages and i don't know of any essential feature like that that they have not supported on Linux but do on windows.
                  lol, you know very little. "nvidia fuck you" for optimus is many years old

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
                    what makes you think nvidia cards have hardware for adaptive sync?
                    - They are somehow feeding gsync monitors with dynamic refresh rates
                    - It's not like there's any special hardware on the graphics card specifically for gsync. All that's needed is a display port 1.2 or later display interface.
                    - They have modern display port connectors, and while they don't claim to be 1.2a compatible, I'm sure they could with the right software. It's a very small step.
                    - All the complicated hardware which enables dynamic refresh rates is in the monitor, not the graphics card

                    Yes, it is an assumption on my part, but I don't think it's far fetched.

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                    • #60
                      Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
                      No, i don't. Nvidia has supported gsync for ages and i don't know of any essential feature like that that they have not supported on Linux but do on windows.
                      If nvidia's proprietary adaptive sync is somehow "essential" then isn't their proprietary hardware screen recording stuff also? How about the GPU switching stuff that has been causing linux users headaches for almost a decade at this point?

                      Sounds to me like you've just taken exactly what Nvidia does and decided that's the "essential" stuff.
                      "Why should I want to make anything up? Life's bad enough as it is without wanting to invent any more of it."

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