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NVIDIA Linux Performance-Per-Dollar: What The RX 480 Will Have To Compete Against

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  • rubdos
    replied
    Originally posted by H.F.P View Post

    Hmm, I wonder if the relative performance of the Linux vs. Windows evaluation on "AMD" is actually based on the PRO driver (closed source), the RadeonSi driver (open source), or "the best of both"?
    Let me check...
    Code:
    =(MAX(C3;D3)-B3)/B3
    , I used best of both. My reasoning probably is that AMD promised to port some of their PRO features to the Mesa stuff. If you want to, I can make a Mesa vs PRO too? I have the data now...

    Leave a comment:


  • bridgman
    replied
    Understood. That post was specifically in response to a follow-on comment by another poster.

    I have to admit, every time I see one of these "OMG AMD does XYZ" where XYZ is pretty much common practice across all the competing vendors it reminds me of the start of the Great LaRouche Toad-Frog Massacre from Bloom County:

    COMMUNISTS AT U.S. DOORSTEP
    by Milo Bloom, Investigative Reporter
    Today it was discovered that after years of aggressive expansion, the Soviet Union has stretched its borders to within a mere 12 miles of American soil. The State Department has no immediate comment.
    ...which wasn't particularly surprising since the State Department had been aware for some time that the easternmost tip of Siberia comes within a polar bear's whisker of Alaska, but who cares since it's too damned cold to worry about. But the vast bulk of the Beacon's readership had no such knowledge and a subdued rumble of patriotic consternation coursed through the local population like some frightening new flu virus. The consensus was that something ought to be done.

    "SOMETHING," bellowed Steve Dallas at a hastily called town meeting, "SHOULD BE DONE!" He pounded the table, looking properly drunk with nationalistic fervor. Eunice Annanburg suggested CIA assassinations of most of the Kremlin, but she was soundly overruled in favor of a more moderate response. A letter would be dispatched to the President informing him of the crisis. (Years later, Caspar Weinberger would write in his memoirs that he had been sent to the White House to reassure Mr. Reagan that it wasn't necessary to send the Sixth Fleet to investigate this new business. We were pleased our letter had attracted the attention it deserved. The President was a fave-rave in Bloom County.)

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post
    NVidia made just over 900 H1B applications in the last 5 years and has just over 4000 employees in NA. We had a slightly lower number of applications and AFAIK have about the same number of employees in NA. Perhaps I'm math challenged but I don't see how that makes them "more American" either.
    FWIW, I did say that it's not only about designing GPUs in another country, and I didn't even mention H1B's. Though I put jobs as the first point, the current engineering job market actually ranks it near the bottom.

    A lot of my concerns revolve around China's path towards dominance of this industry.

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  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by shill View Post
    It's pretty safe to say that NVIDIA is 'more american' when your employer has over 10% of it's employees here on the H1B visa.
    NVidia made just over 900 H1B applications in the last 5 years and has just over 4000 employees in NA. We had a slightly lower number of applications and AFAIK have about the same number of employees in NA. Perhaps I'm math challenged but I don't see how that makes them "more American" either.

    You're going to find that tech companies tend to have fairly consistent global footprints.

    http://www.amd.com/Documents/amd-global-operations.pdf

    http://www.myvisajobs.com/Visa-Spons...93956_Visa.htm

    http://www.myvisajobs.com/Visa-Spons...15602_Visa.htm

    http://www.nvidia.ca/object/fy14-gcr...rformance.html
    Last edited by bridgman; 06-26-2016, 05:24 PM.

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  • dungeon
    replied
    coder
    Ah i don't see rush there as most people buying cards in $100-$300 price range, call that middle range or cards with nice performance and affordable price. Those never win any benchmarks of course high end does that - but GTX 1070 is $450, 1080 is $600/$700 or so. (where real current prices actualy goes beyond $500 for 1070 and even beyond $800 for GTX 1080)

    Now where $200 RX 480 is in the whole story? It might touch or beat perfromance of cards from previous gen which costs in range of $300-$400... so that is shortest story, what perf costed that much now cost $200
    Last edited by dungeon; 06-26-2016, 05:34 PM.

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  • shill
    replied
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post

    I don't think coder realized that NVidia also had a large R&D center in Shanghai, so saw NVidia as being "more American"...
    It's pretty safe to say that NVIDIA is 'more american' when your employer has over 10% of it's employees here on the H1B visa.

    Leave a comment:


  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by dungeon View Post
    Now, what this new middle range performance might touch or beat from earlier high end, should be interesting to see but is just an secondary question as real high end from new gen is yet to come
    What most people don't understand is that this has become uncommon. Maybe 10 years ago, each generation of GPUs would be about as fast as the next tier up from the previous gen, but that hasn't been true for a while. So, it's notable that this generation has managed to do it again (mostly due to process improvements).

    I think it's pretty interesting how AMD and Nvidia are both dealing with cost & yield issues, on the new node. I prefer AMD's strategy, if only they could've timed their launch to coincide with the GTX 1070's.

    Leave a comment:


  • dungeon
    replied
    Originally posted by Anarchy View Post

    That is inconsequential to the problem at hand. Right now AMD does not have a response to nvidia's Pascal. That should change by the end of the month, but if rx 480 has performance level similar to rx 390x then they've failed again.
    He, he RX 480 does not even compete with that one

    I dunno why people complicate things, as AMD going from 28 nm to 14 nm process and release 3 cards in price range of $100, $150 and $200. Cards are RX 460, RX 470 and RX 480. Without much detailing, for most users those can be seen as succesors of R7 360, R7 370 and R9 380. Basicaly newer cards will be sort of double faster then earlier from mid range, mostly thanks to new process and that is how people should look at these

    Now, what this new middle range performance might touch or beat from earlier high end, should be interesting to see but is just an secondary question as real high end from new gen is yet to come

    Leave a comment:


  • Tomin
    replied
    I think it's confusing when high-end for Nvidia ends with 80 and for AMD 80 means mid-range.

    Anyway, I'm thinking of buying 460 or 470 (AMD Radeon ofc) for my desktop later this year depending on how much they cost (in Finland!) and how they perform. I don't demand very much, but I also don't like to buy cards once a while. My current best setup has GeForce GTX 460 that I bought five years ago as brand new. It is enough for my purposes although I have to use proprietary drivers and I don't get Wayland that way (no Vulkan either!). The other computer has just Radeon HD 6670, that I bought second hand two years ago, and it doesn't quite cut it even for CS:GO at FullHD with quite low settings (haven't tried it lately though) so I'm thinking of replacing that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anarchy
    replied
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post

    That seems like an odd comment - you're saying that if our midrange card doesn't outperform NVidia's high end card then we have failed somehow ?

    I would love to understand the logic behind that, unless you are just saying "some people are stupid and that's what they will think".
    my comment disappeared. I'm writing it again.

    Correct me if I'm wrong but nvidia's x(x)70 cards always end up as their midrange offerings, so once AMD releases the rx 480 nvidia might be inclined to substantially reduce the price of the gtx 1070. Although that's dependent on the time, customers might be inclined to consider the nvidia's midrange offering because of its (slightly?) better performance compared to the rx 480. my 2c.

    Leave a comment:

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