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  • #71


    This is what would be absolutely nice to have on Linux, too. Not the UI but the possibilities. The overdrive value is now exposed in the sysfs. Such exposed clocks and voltages for each dpm state would be a dream...

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    • #72
      Originally posted by juno View Post
      -IMAGE REMOVED FROM THE QUOTE FOR OBVIOUS REASONS-
      This is what would be absolutely nice to have on Linux, too. Not the UI but the possibilities. The overdrive value is now exposed in the sysfs. Such exposed clocks and voltages for each dpm state would be a dream...
      Also the GUI. Would be nice to have a overclocking GUI like that. Simple, minimal, elegant.

      Overclocking GUIs are usually designed by the same people that tune cars, and it's bad.

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      • #73
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        Also the GUI. Would be nice to have a overclocking GUI like that. Simple, minimal, elegant.

        Overclocking GUIs are usually designed by the same people that tune cars, and it's bad.
        Yes, I agree on that, but I didn't mean to say that I dislike this ui, it just has no priority imho. There is no UI for radeon settings atm at all, you know. When everything is exposed via sysfs, the community or distributions could provide a UI for the settings, fitting in each DE.

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        • #74
          Whatever the results will be, props to AMD for sending the card.

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          • #75
            Originally posted by juno View Post
            Is this due to the efforts of letting OpenCL run over ROC or is P10 really meant for hpc, too?
            All of the above and more. It's designed as an efficient gaming chip not an HPC monster but the TF/W numbers are interesting. Doesn't necessarily replace Fiji because some HPC apps really benefit from memory bandwidth though.

            That said the main reason though is making sure the ROC stack is supported on a broad range of hardware, partly for OpenCL and partly just to make the stack broadly useful and convenient for developers.
            Last edited by bridgman; 06-24-2016, 07:39 AM.

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            • #76
              please ..x265 video ..... 4k video / game .....test

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              • #77
                Originally posted by rogatti View Post
                please ..x265 video ..... 4k video / game .....test
                4K testing is a given these days....
                Michael Larabel
                http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                • #78
                  Yep, AMD sent over a Radeon RX 480 graphics card for being able to provide launch-day Linux benchmarks next week.
                  AMD DID IT! Finally!!!

                  On side note I wonder why the hell AMD uses this odd cooling system in their reference designs? Speaking for myself I really like when PC is powerful but quiet. But their weird turbo-blowers are doomed to rotate quite fast and therefore produce unpleasant noise. I always have to hunt some non-reference designs using 1-2 large, slow-rotating fans to keep my PC silent. Why the hell AMD can't do it in reference design? Noisy PC suxx, dammit.
                  Last edited by SystemCrasher; 06-24-2016, 10:37 PM.

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                  • #79
                    Originally posted by SystemCrasher View Post
                    AMD DID IT! Finally!!!

                    On side note I wonder why the hell AMD uses this odd cooling system in their reference designs? Speaking for myself I really like when PC is powerful but quiet. But their weird turbo-blowers are doomed to rotate quite fast and therefore produce unpleasant noise. I always have to hunt some non-reference designs using 1-2 large, slow-rotating fans to keep my PC silent. Why the hell AMD can't do it in reference design? Noisy PC suxx, dammit.

                    Encouraging numerous vendors to compete in a relatively low margin business with minimal differentiation is tricky. Because of that reference designs:
                    * allow the AIB vendors to differentiate
                    * allow the AIB vendors to hit a range or prices/needs
                    * improve time to market
                    * generate good reviews/demand
                    * improve profit for those that demand cards immediately

                    So the blower designs have some advantages:
                    * they work well even in cases with marginal cooling
                    * they help ensure the CPU doesn't' throttle by leaking heat into the case, to avoid bad reviews
                    * they exhaust a large fraction of the heat out the back

                    They aren't however the quietest, but that's a good thing. That way the AIB vendors will actually spend some R&D on a better cooler/fan system and then have something to brag about. Might even spend some marketing yelling about how they are 2x quieter than the reference design.

                    If the reference design was perfect, then the AIB vendors wouldn't bother to differentiate, and likely wouldn't market as hard. Thus less sales for AMD.

                    The good news for the patient is that you'll get a cheaper and much quieter card if you just wait a month or so. By waiting that month you'll either get a cheaper card, of if you pay the same prices you'll end up with a card with better cooling/features that you think justifies the price.


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                    • #80
                      Originally posted by BillBroadley View Post
                      So the blower designs have some advantages:
                      * they work well even in cases with marginal cooling
                      Are AMD sure owners of these cases are eagerly buying $150-200 cards? If one does not gets why they need proper cooling of their case, they wouldn't get why they want powerful GPU either I guess.

                      * they help ensure the CPU doesn't' throttle by leaking heat into the case, to avoid bad reviews
                      OTOH it warrants uninspiring reviews when it comes to noise and somesuch.

                      * they exhaust a large fraction of the heat out the back
                      Maybe not the worst idea ever bit it damn noisy and most users hate noisy PCs.

                      Might even spend some marketing yelling about how they are 2x quieter than the reference design.
                      Hmm, sounds reasonable. Though some are still selling reference designs. But quite few of them fortunately . On dark side it makes AMD's own engineering to look less exciting.

                      The good news for the patient is that you'll get a cheaper and much quieter card if you just wait a month or so.
                      I wonder if that's what AMD or manufacturers really want.

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