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NVIDIA GeForce GT 710: Trying The Newest Sub-$50 GPU On Linux

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  • NVIDIA GeForce GT 710: Trying The Newest Sub-$50 GPU On Linux

    Phoronix: NVIDIA GeForce GT 710: Trying The Newest Sub-$50 GPU On Linux

    At the end of January NVIDIA rolled out the GeForce GT 710. This isn't some shiny new low-end Maxwell card, but rather from the Kepler lineage and retails for under $50 USD as a discrete solution to compete with integrated Intel and AMD graphics. Here are some initial benchmarks of a passively-cooled ASUS GeForce GT 710 under Linux.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=22792

  • #2
    the only point of this card if the old one burn and we don't have a igpu

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    • #3
      Originally posted by andre30correia View Post
      the only point of this card if the old one burn and we don't have a igpu
      For some people, having the lowest-end discrete GPU is a question of freedom because it allows them to freely choose the CPU they like without restricting the choice to just CPUs with integrated graphics. If a user nevertheless later decides to buy a CPU with integrated graphics, having a spare discrete GPU will allow the user to freely choose when upgrading the machine to a newer next-generation CPU.

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      • #4
        Integrated graphics have come a long way, and, in the case of a relatively new processor with integrated graphics, the GT 710 won't be a upgrade at all. Exceptions from this would be with processors without integrated graphics, or with some specific issues like if the processor/motherboard -combination does not support 1440p whereas the GT 710 does. Or maybe in some situation some problems with the Intel or AMD drivers could warrant a switch to Nvidia... (Maybe a motherboard with Radeon HD 3000 series graphics - yes, those are still sold - would warrant an upgrade because of the poor driver support.)

        In short, the GT 710 should not be presented as an upgrade to integrated graphics, although in some situations it can be a reasonable solution, especially with older hardware.

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        • #5
          you should try this gpu on 720p not 1080p it is unthinkable use this gpu for 1080p

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          • #6
            Now if it were to decode new video codecs used for 4K and output it to HDMI 2.0
            But what the hell is this thing supposed to do, except cost more money than a Intel GPU and need another driver and more space in the case.

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            • #7
              Some ppl will like passive cooling, will be interesting to see if the discrete DDR3 memory will improve performance from integrated; though graphics/compute only benchmarks praps won't show as much benefit as dual tasks, eg) running kernel compile on an i7 whilst fooling around on a desktop or some light 3D like secondlife.

              Having the whole CPU TDP budget for compute, ought to help a bit in some situations.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by andre30correia View Post
                the only point of this card if the old one burn and we don't have a igpu
                Even though this wouldn't be a big seller and the performance isn't great, there are certainly uses for it, including:
                - Usage of an old PC as a HTPC, due to great h264 support. No h265 support unfortunately.
                - Great Linux support.
                - Enterprise quality OpenGL, OpenCL and CUDA support.
                - Less microstutter.

                I would take this card over any integrated GPU any day.

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                • #9
                  What was the point in running games on Ultra/High with it?

                  If you want to actually make your benchmarks useful, why not show people what it can actually do at a reasonable level?

                  Some of the most useless benchmarks I've seen recently here.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by liamdawe View Post
                    What was the point in running games on Ultra/High with it?

                    If you want to actually make your benchmarks useful, why not show people what it can actually do at a reasonable level?

                    Some of the most useless benchmarks I've seen recently here.
                    +1... very useless benchmark.
                    they must try this gpu on 720p low, mid and high detail and 1080p on low detail.
                    is useless test this gpu with 1080p and max graphics details

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