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LuxCoreRender 2.5 OptiX Performance Tested With 19 NVIDIA GPUs

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  • LuxCoreRender 2.5 OptiX Performance Tested With 19 NVIDIA GPUs

    Phoronix: LuxCoreRender 2.5 OptiX Performance Tested With 19 NVIDIA GPUs

    Released last week was the LuxCoreRender 2.5 open-source physically based renderer. Significant with this v2.5 update is OptiX/RTX acceleration support in addition to its existing CUDA, OpenCL, and CPU render paths. Given that, here are some fresh benchmarks of LuxCoreRender 2.5 across an assortment of NVIDIA graphics cards.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30129

  • #2
    Is there a reason for the "nivida-only" featured topics of the last days ?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post
      Is there a reason for the "nivida-only" featured topics of the last days ?
      This is OptiX, which is a piece of software only compatible with NVIDIA GPUs. When LuxRender has a Vulkan RT acceleration path, then that'll be something to compare.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post
        Is there a reason for the "nivida-only" featured topics of the last days ?
        Michael explains it in the first sentence in this article: https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-compute&num=1
        Recently from NVIDIA we received the rest of the NVIDIA RTX 30 series line-up for cards we haven't been able to benchmark under Linux previously, thus it's been a busy month of Ampere benchmarking for these additional cards and re-testing the existing parts.

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        • #5
          Thx for clearification sry for missing out the obvious stuff ...already late here in germany

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          • #6
            NVIDIA is just quite far ahead of AMD in the whole RT and DLSS, and other accelerated API's department atm. Not sure when AMD intends to catch up, maybe their waiting for 7000 series release? who knows...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by theriddick View Post
              NVIDIA is just quite far ahead of AMD in the whole RT and DLSS, and other accelerated API's department atm. Not sure when AMD intends to catch up, maybe their waiting for 7000 series release? who knows...
              Meh, not really. Even if you own compatible hardware and have the right game, enabling the setting causes a *massive* drop in performance, for a minor improvement in visuals. Only a handful of games even supports it. I've heard plenty of folks trying it out, saying "gee that's nifty" and then promptly disabling the feature because performance is so bad. Certainly the e-Sports crowd has zero interest. I don't see why AMD should be in a hurry to adopt an unpopular performance-killing feature. Kind of reminds me of Intel and their AVX-512 fiasco.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                Meh, not really..
                When paired with DLSS its quite the opposite however. Plus many people have 1080p screens still which RT should work quite well on, however I see little point in using RT or DLSS with games like Battlefield and other competitive online shooters.

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                • #9
                  For me, as a fanbois of AMD going back to my first PC in 1990, a Tanden laptop which had an AMD 286 at 12 mhz, after ditching my trusty Commodore 64, and hopping that laptop up with a Cyrix math co-processor, and having AMD CPU's, GPUs and eventually APUs in every PC and laptop for the next 30 years.....I think I will be transitioning over to Intel and Nvidia.

                  I'm actually throwing up in my mouth a little as I write this.

                  Here's why. The non PC world, ie, Apple and Google with Android and ChromeOS are not DYI worlds. And increasingly neither is the PC world. Prices have skyrocketed and supply has been constrained. The only way to get good deals on components is to choose an OEM with economies of scale. Unfortunately with the combined might of Intel and Nvidia along with their industry leading software and compiler support, OEMs are much more likely to sell you a moderately priced laptop or desktop that doesn't have a cut rate BIOS with broken ACPI tables and a broken IOMMU as almost EVERY AMD PC and laptop I've purchased from OEMs like HP and Lenovo and Dell.

                  Not to mention improper or non working AMD wake from sleep.

                  Not to mention poorer battery life with AMD based laptops, particularly with Linux.

                  Yes...yes...AMD is smoking Intel in the HPC world. But we and I don't buy Supercomputers. In the consumer world AMD just gets shit on. And that turd ball rolls into Linux even harder.

                  And now comes word that AMD is NOT going to roll out the Zen 3 Cenzanne APU for DYI, only OEMs. And with a Vega GPU, not RDNA 1 or 2. And will probably have shit BIOS settings, broken ACPI tables and a hamstrung IOMMU as well, like before.

                  Also, AMD has NO...NONE...ZIP...coherent or even evident A.I. strategy for their systems. Intel does. Nividia has had one for years. And they won't still with the introduction of ZEN 4. A.I. through Radeon either RDNA or CDNA will be hamstrung by the state of OpenCL and ROCm vs Intel's OneAPI and Nvidia's CUDA. But to make matters worse, Intel actually had NPU IP and hardware ready to go in their "Tiles" Architecture. Same with Nvidia.

                  Nothing from AMD. Not even a vaporware announcement.

                  AMD has become a Server, HPC, Supercomputer and Console Gaming company. Consumer PC products...not so much. And the OEMs know this and follow through with shit support and board specs. And then their is the continued harassment and intimidation by Intel to make sure those OEMs who DO have AMD offerings make it hard for the consumer to find them much less properly spec one out. Just go to Dell's Alienware site and try finding and speccing an AMD Alienware rig. They're there. But you'll give up and just go buy an Intel/NNvidia after 5 minutes.

                  I've already do most of my computing on ARM based products anymore, Android, Chromebook, and Apple. But my next Linux box when I retire my AMD Bristol Ridge desktop and laptop will have an Intel CPU (probably Alder Ridge) and an Nvidia RTX GPU. Probably the 3060. Even compared to the RTX 3060 Ti, the 3060 has a lot of grunt and has a lower TDP and runs cooler. And I know that my components will have proper OEM support, PARTICULARLY since I plan on buying a system from Lenovo from their ThinkCentre line and their Thinkpad line.

                  I really hate this. But killer HPC and Supercomputer benchmarks from AMD don't cut it for me anymore. I need TOTAL system support from my rigs and FOR my rigs. I get that from my Qualcomm based Google phone and Intel based Chromebooks. And my Apple Silicon equipped tablet.

                  I need that from my Linux rigs also. And I'm not getting that from AMD based rigs.

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